Tables for your convenience, enlightenment, and enjoyment.
Apgar Scale. This scale was developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar in 1952. It is used to rate a newborn at 1 minute and 5
minutes old on muscle tone, respiration, color, reflex irritability, and heart rate. A score of 7 -- 10 means that things are just
fine. Between 4 and 6, the baby may need assistance with breathing. Below 4, the baby will need life-saving measures taken.
Bell Curve
IQ Scores & Ratings
What is a good IQ score?  What is a high IQ score?  What is a low IQ score?  These are common questions, particularly after
someone finds out their score from an IQ test.

Lewis Terman (1916) developed the original notion of IQ and proposed this scale for classifying IQ scores:










Normal Distribution & IQ Scores
The properties of the normal distribution apply to IQ scores:










Low IQ & Intellectual Disability
5% of people have an IQ under 70 and this is generally considered as the benchmark for intellectual disability, a condition of
limited mental ability in that it produces difficulty in adapting to the demands of life.

Severity of intellectual disability can be broken into 4 levels:





High IQ & Genius IQ
Genius IQ is generally considered to begin around 140 to 145, representing ~.25% of the population (1 in 400).  Here's a
rough guide:









More notes on High IQ and Genius IQ:
Einstein was considered to "only" have an IQ of about 160.
Mensa is a society for people with high IQ, in the top 2% (1 in 50).
In 1926, psychologist Catherine Morris Cox published a study "of the most eminent men and women" who had lived between
1450 and 1850 to estimate what their IQs might have been.


LOOK AT OTHER GENIUSES!!
Cranial Nerves
CN 1: Olfactory Nerve -- SMELL (nose)
CN 2: Optic Nerve -- VISION (eyes)
CN 3: Oculomotor Nerve -- EYELID and EYEBALL MOVEMENT (eyes)
CN 4: Trochlear Nerve -- INNERVATES SUPERIOR OBLIQUE; TURNS EYE DOWNWARD and LATERALLY
CN 5: Trigeminal Nerve -- CHEWING, FACE and MOUTH; TOUCH and PAIN
CN 6: Abducens Nerve -- TURNS EYE LATERALLY
CN 7: Facial Nerve -- CONTROLS MOST FACIAL EXPRESSIONS; SECRETION OF TEARS; SALIVA, TASTE
CN 8: Acoustic Nerve (Auditory; Vestibulocochlear) -- HEARING, EQUILIBRIUM SENSATION
CN 9: Glossopharyngeal Nerve -- TASTE; SENSES CAROTID BLOOD PRESSURE
CN 10: Vagus Nerve -- SENSES AORTIC BLOOD PRESSURE, SLOWS HEART RATE, STIMULATES DIGESTIVE
ORGANS, TASTE
CN 11: Spinal Accessory nerve -- CONTROLS TRAPEZIUS and STERNOCLEIDOMASTOID; STIMULATES DIGESTIVE
ORGANS; TASTE
CN 12: Hypoglossal Nerve -- CONTROLS TONGUE MOVEMENTS

A mnemonic to remember the cranial nerves is:
"On Old Olympic Towering Tops A Finn and German Viewed Some Hops"

Another: "Oh Once One Takes The Anatomy Final Very Good Vacations Are Heavenly"
(note this mnemonic uses "Vestibulocochlear" for cranial nerve 8 -- Acoustic AND "Accessory" for cranial nerve 11 -- Spinal
Accessory)

Another: "On, On, On, They Traveled And Found Voldemort Guarding Very Ancient (Secret) Horcruxes."
Over 140 - Genius or near genius
120 - 140 - Very superior intelligence
110 - 119 - Superior intelligence
90 - 109 - Normal or average intelligence
80 - 89 - Dullness
70 - 79 - Borderline deficiency
Under 70 - Definite feeble-mindedness
50% of IQ scores fall between 90 and
110
70% of IQ scores fall between 85 and
115
95% of IQ scores fall between 70 and
130
99.5% of IQ scores fall between 60 and
140
50-70 - Mild intellectual disability (85%)
35-50 - Moderate intellectual disability (10%)
20-35 - Severe intellectual disability (4%)
IQ < 20 - Profound intellectual disability (1%)
115-124 - Above average (e.g., university students)
125-134 - Gifted (e.g., post-graduate students)
135-144 - Highly gifted (e.g., intellectuals)
145-154 - Genius (e.g., professors)
155-164 - Genius (e.g., Nobel Prize winners)
165-179 - High genius
180-200 - Highest genius
>200 - "Unmeasurable genius"
  MUSCLE TONE
HEART RATE
RESPIRATION
REFLEX
IRRITABILITY
COLOR
0 points
Floppy tone;
limp; no
movement.
No heart beat.
Not breathing.
No response to
airways being
sunctioned.
The baby's
whole body is
bluish gray or
pale.
1 point
Some flexion of
arms and legs.
Fewer than 100
beats per minute.
Weak cry, may
sound like
whimpering; slow
or irregular
breating.
Grimace during
suctioning.
Good color
(pink) in body
with bluish hands
and feet.
2 points
Active motion.
At least 100
beats per minute.
Strong, lusty cry,
normal rate and
effort of breathing.
Grimace and pull
away; cough or
sneeze during
suction.
Good color all
over.