About a Silence in Literature by Živorad Stojković (Banned in Yugoslavia by court order in 1951.)

About David (1980) by Susan Beth Pfeffer.

Abduction! (2004) by Peg Kehret (Challenged but retained at the two Apple Valley, Massachusetts middle- and eight elementary-school libraries [2006] despite the complaint that
the book was too violent.)

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (2007) by Sherman Alexie (Suspended from a Crook County High School classroom in Prineville, Oregon in 2008 after a
parent complained that it was offensive. The New York Times bestseller and a National Book Award winner will remain out of the classroom until the school district can revamp its
policies. The book is about a boy growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation who decides to attend an all-white school. The protagonist in Alexie's book discusses masturbation.
Retained on the summer reading list at Antioch, Illinois High School [2009] despite objections from several parents who found its language vulgar and racist. In response to concerns,
however, the district will form a committee each March to review future summer reading assignments. The committee, which will include parents, would decide whether parents should
be warned if a book contains possibly objectionable material.)

(B) The Accumulation of Capital: A Contribution to an Economic Expansion of Imperialism (1930) by Rosa Luxembourg.

Achingly Alice (1998) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor (Banned from the Webb City, Missouri school library in 2002 because the book promotes homosexuality and "discusses issues
best left to parents.")

Adam Bede (1859) by George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans)  ("Vile outpourings of a lewd woman's mind.").

Adolescents Today (1986) by John S. Dacey.

The Advancement of Learning (1605) by Sir Francis Bacon.

The Adventures of Captain Underpants (1997) by Dav Pilkey ("Causes unruly behavior.")

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) by Mark Twain ("Racist." "Degrading, insensitive, and oppressive." "Use of the word 'nigger.'" Banned in 1885 in the Concord,
Massachusetts library for being what the Public Library Committee called "trash". From a newspaper clipping: Boston Evening Transcript March 17, 1885 p. 6 "Huckleberry Finn"
Barred Out. The Concord (Mass.) Public Library committee has decided to exclude Mark Twain's latest book from the library. One member of the committee says that, while he does not
wish to call it immoral, he thinks it contains but little humor, and that of a very coarse type. He regards it as the veriest trash. The librarian and the other members of the committee
entertain similar views, characterizing it as rough, coarse and inelegant, dealing with a series of experiences not elevating, the whole book being more suited to the slums that to
intelligent, respectable people." Read other press items
HERE. Challenged in the Normal, Illinois Community high school’s sophomore literature class in 2003 as being degrading to
African Americans. Pulled from the reading lists at the three Renton, Washington high schools in 2004 after an African American student said the book degraded her and her culture.
The novel, which is not required reading in Renton schools but is on a supplemental list of approved books, was eventually retained for classroom usage. Pulled from classes in Taylor,
Michigan, schools [2006] because of complaints about its liberal use of common racial slurs. Challenged as required reading at Cactus High in Peoria, Arizona [2006]. The student and
mother have threatened to file a civil-rights complaint because of alleged racial treatment, the segregation of the student, and the use of a racial slur in the classroom. Challenged in the
Lakeville, Minnesota High School [2007] and St. Louis Park High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota [2007] as required reading for sophomores. Retained in the Manchester,
Connecticut School District [2008] with the requirement that teachers attend seminars on how to deal with issues of race before teaching the book in their classrooms.)

The Adventures of Super Diaper Baby (2002) by Dav Pilkey (Challenged, but retained in the Riverside, California Union School District classrooms and libraries in 2003 despite a
complaint of the book's "inappropriate scatological storyline.")

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) by Mark Twain ("Racist, dangerous." "Too full of racially charged language.")

Adventures in English Literature.

Aesop's Fables
by Aesop (According to the legend, the Greek slave and storyteller was flung from the cliffs at Delphi for sacrilege.)

A Feast for the Seaweeds (1983) by Haidar Haidar (Banned in Egypt and several other Arab states, and even resulted in a belated angry reaction from the clerics of Al-Azhar
University upon reprinting in Egypt in the year 2000. The clerics issued a fatwa banning the novel and accused Haidar of heresy and offending Islam. Al-Azhar University students
staged huge protests against the novel, that eventually led to its confiscation. --
wikipedia.)

The Affluent Society (1958) by John Kenneth Galbraith ("I will do anything to thwart permissive liberalism." They should be "balanced by at least four books with conservative
viewpoints.")

After the First Death (1979) by Robert Cormier.

The Age of Reason (1794) by Thomas Paine (More than one publisher was prosecuted for printing this book, which argues for Deism and against Christianity and Atheism.
"Blasphemous." Theodore Roosevelt called Paine "a filthy little atheist.")

The Agony of Alice (1985) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor.

Alan and Naomi (1977) by Myron Levoy ("Has a sad ending.")

Alas, Babylon (1959) by Pat Frank.

The Alfred Summer (1980) by Jan Slepian.

Alice Alone (2001) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor.

Alice in April (1993) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor.

Alice In-Between (1994) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor.

Alice in Jeopardy (2005) by Ed McBain (Evan Hunter) (Challenged at the Sno-Isle Libraries in Arlington, Washington [2006] because of "curse words and graphic sex scenes.")

Alice in Lace (1996) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor (Banned from the Webb City, Missouri school library in 2002 because the book promotes homosexuality and "discusses issues best
left to parents.")

Alice in Rapture, Sort Of (1989) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor.

Alice On Her Way (2005) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor (Restricted to students who have parental consent at the Icicle River Middle School library in Leavenworth, Washington
[2008] due to its depiction of sexuality. Parents challenged the book's use of classroom reading because of 'two cuss words'.)

Alice on the Outside  (1999) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor ("Sexually explicit.")

Alice the Brave (1995) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor ("Sexual references.")

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) by Lewis Carroll ("Contains expletives, references to masturbation and sexual fantasies, and derogatory characterizations of a teachers
and of religious ceremonies." "Animals should not use human language, and that it was disastrous to put animals and human beings on the same level." Banned in Hunan, China
beginning in 1931 for its portrayal of anthropomorphized animals acting on the same level of complexity as human beings. The censor General Ho Chien believed that this insulted
humans.)

All But Alice (1992) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor ("Alice and her brother discuss song lyrics dealing with sexual activities including necrophilia.")

All Over But the Shoutin' (1998) by Rick Bragg.

(B) All Quiet on the Western Front (1928) by Erich Marcia Remarque ("Blasphemous." "Demoralizes and insults the Wehrmacht." "Anti-war propaganda." "Obscene." "Offensive
language." "Globalism." "Far-right scare words.")

All the King's Men (1946) by Robert Penn Warren.

All the Pretty Horses (1992) by Cormac McCarthy ("Vulgar language, sexual explicitness, and violent imagery that is gratuitously employed.")

Alt Ed (2003) by Catherine Atkins (Challenged as an optional reading in a bullying unit at the Lake Oswego, Oregon Junior High School [2007] because the novel is "peppered with
profanities, ranging from derogatory slang terms to sexual encounters and violence." Students are given a list of book summaries and a letter to take to their parents. Four of the 8
optional books offered are labeled as having "mature content/language.")

Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned (1998) by Walter Mosley.

Always Running La Vida Loca: Gang Days in LA (1993) by Luis J. Rodriguez (Challenged, but retained in three Beyer High School classrooms in Modesto, California in 2003
despite complaints that the book is “pornographic.” The decision reversed the actions of district administrators who had removed the book in early November, 2003. The book won the
Chicago Sun Times Carl Sandburg Literary Award and was designated as a New York Times notable book. "Violence and sex." "Pornographic and offensive in its stereotyping of
Latinos.")

The Amazing Bone (1976) by William Steig.

America (2002) by E.R. Frank (Challenged in the Ravenna, Ohio schools [2007] because, "What we kept finding and going over was sexual content and profanity," said the
complainant. The novel has received several awards including the New York Times Notable Book Award. It was also a Garden State Teen Book Award nominee.)

America (the Book): A Citizen's Guide to Democracy Inaction: With a Forward by Thomas Jefferson (2004) by Jon Stewart, Ben Karlin, and David Javerbaum
("Supreme Court is shown naked.")

American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (1969; 1980; 1992) ("Objectionable words." "Has slang definitions for words such as bed, knocker, and balls.")

American Psycho (1991) by Bret Easton Ellis (Was originally to be published by Simon and Schuster, but they withdrew after protests from the National Organization of Women
calling the book "dangerously misogynistic." The New York Times headlined a review of the book "Don't Buy This Book." Sale and purchase of this book was banned in the Australian
State of Queensland. It is now only available for people aged 18 and older.)

Am I Blue?: Coming Out From the Silence (1994) edited by Marian Dane Bauer ("Sexual identity confusion and gay fairy-godfather.")

The Amulet of Samarkand (The Bartimeaus Trilogy, Book 1) (2003) by Jonathan Stroud (Restored by the Lackawanna, New York school board [2008] following accusations of
censorship by some parents and teachers. The book was pulled from the middle school library recommended list because of concerns that the book deals with the occult.)

(B) Analects by Confucius (551 -- 479 BC) (The first ruler of the Chin Dynasty ordered all books relating to the teachings of Confucius burned. Oh, and he had hundreds of followers
of Confucius buried alive [250 BC]. When Confucian books and scholars were burned by Qin dynasty officials, a single copy of the sage's works was saved in the state library.)

An American Tragedy (1925) by Theodore Dreiser.

(B) An Appeal to Reason (1930) by Thomas Mann.

The Anarchist Cookbook (1971) by William Powell ("Security reasons.")

Anastasia Again! (1981) by Lois Lowry ("Refers to beer, playboy magazine, suicide.")

Anastasia At Your Service! (1982) by Lois Lowry ("Subtle and filthy, sexually and socially perverts, abuses, and scandalizes innocent children.")

Anastasia Krupnik (1979) by Lois Lowry ("Use of vulgarity for human waste." "References to underage drinking." "The phrase 'crock of shit' appears twice in the book.")

Anatomy of a Book Controversy (1995) by Wayne Homstad.

Andersonville (1955) by MacKinlay Kantor ("Filth." "1% history and 99% filth." "Unsuitable, objectionable language." "Obscene, promotes immorality.")

And Tango Makes Three (2005) by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell ("Homosexuality." "Anti-family." "Unsuited to age group." "Religious viewpoint." "Anti-ethnic." "Sexism."
Moved from the children's fiction section to children's nonfiction at two Rolling Hill's Consolidated Library's branches in Savannah and St. Joseph, Missouri [2006] after parents
complained it had homosexual undertones. The illustrated book is based on a true story of two male penguins who adopted an abandoned egg at New York City's Central Park in the
late 1990s. Challenged at the Shiloh, Illinois Elementary School library [2006]. A committee of school employees and a parents suggested that the book be moved to a separate shelf,
requiring parent permission before checkout. The school's superintendent, however, rejected the proposal and the book remained on the library shelf. Pulled from four elementary school
libraries in Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina [2006] after a few parents and Mecklenburg County Commissioner Bill James questioned the controversial but true story. The books
were returned after the local paper questioned the ban. It should be noted that there was no formal request for the book's removal. Returned to the general circulation shelves in the
sixteen elementary school libraries in Loudoun County, Virginia [2008] despite a complaint about its subject matter. Withdrawn from two Bristol, England primary schools [2008]
following objections from parents who claimed the book was unsuitable for children and that they had not been consulted on their opinions. Challenged but retained at the Eli Pinney
Elementary School in Dublin, Ohio [2008] despite a parents concerns that the book "is based on one of those subjects that is best left to be discovered by students at another time or in
another place." Challenged in the elementary school library in Ankemy, Iowa [2008] by parents who do not want their children to read the story due to the concern that it promotes
homosexuality. On December 15, 2008, the Ankeny school board members voted six to one to keep the book. Retained in the Chico, California Unified School District [2008] over
complaints that the book is inappropriate for elementary school students. The district review committee determined that the book meets library selection standards and district policy.
Retained by the Calvert County Library in Prince Frederick, Maryland [2008] after requests that the book be removed from the children's section and shelved in a labeled alternative
section. Retained in the Meadowview Elementary School in Farmington, Minnesota [2008] despite a parent's concern that "a topic such as sexual preference does not belong in a library
where it can be obtained by young elementary students." Challenged at the Lodi, California Public Library [2007] by a resident  deriding what she called its "homosexual story line that
has been sugarcoated with cute penguins." Challenged, but retained in the North Kansas City, Mo. schools [2009] despite a parent’s concern that the book wasn’t age-appropriate, didn’t
follow the district’s policy on human sexuality education, and tries to indoctrinate children about homosexuality. In subsequent discussions, the schools appear to be headed towards
segregating elementary school libraries according to “age appropriateness.” Students might be restricted to view or check out materials in their own age-class or younger.)

Angaray (1936) by Sajjad Zaheer (Banned in India in 1936 by the British government.)

Angus, Thongs, and Full-Frontal Snogging (1999) by Louise Rennison (Retained with limited access at the Maplewood Middle School Library in Menasha, Wisconsin [2008].
The coming of age novel, which has sexual content, was found offensive by a parent. In addition to retaining the book, board members voted unanimously to adopt procedures intended
to secure and record parental consent before limited access books are released to students.)

Animal Dreams (1990) by Barbara Kingsolver ("Vulgar language, sexual explicitness, and violent imagery that is gratuitously employed." Challenged in the Manheim Township,
Pennsylvania schools [2007] due to sexual references. The book was moved from ninth-grade English curriculum to the eleventh-grade curriculum.)

Animal Farm: A Fairy Story (1945) by George Orwell ("Anti-Stalin theme." "Religious reasons." "Orwell was a Communist." Publication was delayed in the UK due to anti-Stalin
theme, confiscated in Germany by Allied troops, banned in 1946 in Yugoslavia, also banned in Kenya in 1991 because it criticizes corrupt leaders.  Banned in the United Arab Emirates
in 2002 because it contained text or images that go against Islamic values, most notably the occurrence of an anthropomorphic, talking pig.)

Anna Karenina (1873 to 1877; published in installments) by Leo Tolstoy.

Anne Frank: the Diary of a Young Girl (1947) by Anne Frank ("Too depressing." "Sexually offensive passages." "A real downer." "Pornographic." Challenged at the Culpeper
County, Va. public school [2010] by a parent requesting that her daughter not be required to read the book aloud. Initially, it was reported that officials have decided to stop assigning a
version of Anne Frank’s diary, one of the most enduring symbols of the atrocities of the Nazi regime, due to the complaint that the book includes sexual material and homosexual
themes. The director of instruction announced the edition, published on the fiftieth anniversary of Frank’s death in a concentration camp, will not be used in the future despite the fact
the school system did not follow its own policy for handling complaints. The remarks set off a hailstorm of criticism online and brought international attention to the 7,600-student school
system in rural Virginia. The superintendent said, however, that the book will remain a part of the English classes, although it may be taught at a different grade level.)

(B) Annie on My Mind (1982) by Nancy Garden (Challenged at the Cedar Mill Community library in Portland, Oregon in 1988 because the book promotes lesbian love and sex as
normal. Challenged in the Colony, Texas public library in 1992 because it "promotes and encourages the gay lifestyle." Challenged because it "encourages and condones" homosexuality,
but retained at the Bend, Oregon High School in 1993. Challenged but retained at the Lapeer, Michigan West high school library in 1993. Challenged at several Kansas City area
schools in 1993 after the books were donated by a national group that seeks to give young adults "fair, accurate, and inclusive images of lesbians and gay men" -- at the Shawnee
Mission school district the book was returned to general circulation; at the Olathe East High School the book was removed; protesters burned copies of the book but the Kansas City,
Missouri school district kept the novel on the high school shelves. In Kansas City, Kansas, the school district donated the book to the city's public library; and in Lee's Summit, Missouri,
the superintendent removed the book. The federal district court in Kansas later found the removal of the book unconstitutional and ordered it restored to the school district's libraries.
Challenged, but retained at the Liberty, Missouri High School library and access to them limited to only students with written parental permission because of concerns about its content.)

Another Country (1962) by James Baldwin ("Sex perversion at its vilest.")

The Antagonists (1971) by Ernest K. Gann.

Appointment in Samarra (1934) by John O'Hara.

The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz (1959) by Mordecai Richler.

(B) The Arabian Nights, or, The Thousand and One Nights  (first English version: 1706) anonymous (Banned for decades from the US mail under the Comstock Law of 1873.
Officially known as the Federal Anti-Obscenity Act, this law banned the mailing of lewd, filthy, obscene, or indecent materials. The Comstock laws, while now unenforced, remain for
the most part on the books today. "Contained obscene passages which posed a threat to the country's moral fabric." "An extraordinary agglomeration of filth." "Promotes non-Muslim
faith.")

A Raisin in the Sun (debuted on Broadway in 1959) by Lorraine Hansberry ("Racially degrading.")

Areopagitica: A Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644) by John Milton (Banned in England for political reasons.)

Are You In the House Alone? (1976) by Richard Peck.

Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret (1970) by Judy Blume ("Built around just two themes: sex and anti-Christian behavior." "Profane, immoral, and offensive.")

Arizona Kid (1988?) by Ron Koertge.

Arming America: The Origins of a National Gun Culture (2000) by Michael A. Bellesiles ("Inaccuracy and political viewpoint.")

Arrangement in Literature (1979) by Edmund J. Farrell, Ouida H. Clapp, James L. Pierce, & Raymond J. Rodrigues.

(B) The Art of Love (Ars Amatoria) (published in 3 books between 1 BC and 1 AD) by Ovid (Upon publication of this sly love manual, Ovid was banished from Rome. US
customs banned this work in 1928.)

The Art of Loving (1956) by Erich Fromm.

As I Lay Dying (1930) by William Faulkner ("Seven passages that made reference to God or abortion and used such words as bastard, goddamn, and son of a bitch." Banned in
Kentucky for language and for being anti-Christian.)

Asking About Sex and Growing Up: A Question and Answer Book for Girls and Boys (1988) by Joanna Cole.

Athletic Shorts (1989) by Chris Crutcher ("Homosexuality and offensive language.")

A Thousand Pieces of Gold: My Discovery of China's Character in the History and Meaning of Its Proverbs (2002) by Adeline Yen Mah (**)

Atkol Video Catalogue ("Carries gay titles.")

Atlas Shrugged (1957) by Ayn Rand.

Attack of the Mutant Underwear (2003) by Tom Birdseye (Removed from the Pinellas, Florida school district's Battle of the Books program [2006], although the book is on the
Sunshine State Young Reader's Award list of books for third- through fifth-graders.)

Aura (1962) by Carlos Fuentes (Banned from the curriculum in Puerto Rican public high schools [2009] along with four other books because of coarse language. Written by one of
Latin America’s most prominent contemporary writers, the novel contains a brief romantic encounter beneath a crucifix. It is a scene that prompted Mexico’s former interior secretary to
try to have the book dropped from a reading list at his daughter’s private school, without success. Fuentes said that the attempt boosted sales of the book. The other titles banned were:
Antologia personal, by Jose Luis Gonzalez; Mejor te lo cuento: antologia personal, 1978–2005, by Juan Antonio Ramos; Reunion de espejos, by Jose Luis Vega; and
El entierro de Cortijo: 6 de octubre de 1982, by Edgardo Rodriguez Julia.)

Autobiography: A Reader For Writers (1977) by Robert Lyons.

The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas (1932) by Gertrude Stein.

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (written as "Memoirs" between 1771 to 1790) by Benjamin Franklin.

The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pitman (1971) by Ernest J. Gaines (Challenged as an eighth-grade district-wide reading assignment in the Puyallup, Washington schools
[2006] because "racial slurs and stereotyping are used throughout the book, as well as scenes of sex, rape, and implied incest." The Puyallup School Board voted to uphold an earlier
decision by a district committee requiring eighth-graders to read the novel. In explaining their vote, each board member recounted the difficulty of balancing valid concerns on each side
of the debate. "It wasn't a sole issue of dealing with racism or the 'n-word.'" "But it is our hope by giving them an explanation of the word and where it came from they'll understand it's
inappropriate to use it in the future.")

The Awakening (1899) by Kate Chopin ("Vulgar language, sexual explicitness, or violent imagery that is gratuitously employed." Retained in the Northwest Suburban High School
District 214 reading list in Arlington Heights, Illinois [2006], along with eight other challenged titles. A board member, elected amid promises to bring her Christian beliefs into all board
decision-making, raised the controversy based on excerpts from the books she'd found on the Internet. First published in 1899, this novel so disturbed critics and the public that it was
banned for decades afterward. Challenged at the Oconee County, Georgia library [2011] because the cover of the book shows a picture of a woman's bare chest and this upset the
patron.)

The A-Z Dictionary of Serial Killers (1996) by Harold Schechter and David Everitt (Challenged and retained in the Hillsborough County, Florida school district in 2002
because of a parent's objection to the book's "gruesome details.")
BANNED Books, part 1
Books banned, challenged, or otherwise despised. Reasons, if any were provided, are in parentheses following the author. Books that are listed
after a capital B (B) have also been burned in protest. This list should not be considered comprehensive. Books are listed alphabetically by title.

!!!! The reasons for challenging the books are NOT MY WORDS. Some reasons for banning have been taken from the American
Library Association's banned book lists.
Go to that site.
100 Questions and Answers about AIDS: A Guide for Young People (1992) by Michael Thomas Ford (AIDS.)

33 Snowfish (2003) by Adam Rapp.

1984 (1949) by George Orwell ("Pro-communist and sexually explicit material." "Study of communism." Banned by the Soviet Union in
1950, as Stalin understood that it was a satire based on his leadership. It was nearly banned in USA and UK in the early 1960s during
the Cuban Missile Crisis. It was not until 1990 that the USSR legalized the book and it was re-released after editing.)

13: Thirteen stories that capture the agony and ecstasy of being thirteen (2003) edited by James Howe.

100 Banned Books: Censorship Histories of World Literature (1999) by Nicholas J. Karolides, Rachel Bald, and Dawn B. Sova.

(B) 100% the Story of a Patriot (1920) by Upton Sinclair.

(B) 95 Theses (written 1517) by Martin Luther ("Heretical, or scandalous, or false, or offensive to pious ears, or seductive of simple minds, or repugnant to Catholic truth,
respectively." "A pestiferous virus." After the church burned his books, Luther burned the papal bull, copies of the canon law, and the papal constitutions, saying, "Since they have
burned my books, I burn theirs." He was excommunicated. When he was asked to recant, he said, "Should I recant at this point, I would open the door to more tyranny and impiety, and
it will be all the worse should it appear that I had done so at the instance of the Holy Roman Empire.")

100 Greatest Tyrants (1997) by Andrew Langley (Challenged in the Mount Isa, Queensland, Australia High School [2006] by a legislator who described the book as offensive and
inappropriate for history students in any Australian school. The school principal refused to remove the book from the library, describing it as a useful resource for generating debate and
critical thinking skills among students.)
Books are listed alphabetically by title.

*Wording
: "School officials said the book is too difficult for middle school students and that it could cause harassment
against students seen with it."
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) alleged that this removal is "a pretext for viewpoint-based
censorship," claiming that no other books considered more difficult (works by Shakespeare and Dickens) were removed for this reason.
The ACLU contends that the school officials engaged in unconstitutional viewpoints removed the book because it contains gay and
lesbian material.

**Parents Against Bad Books in Schools always uses the same wording when asking that a book be removed from the school
system or library:
"The book contains profanity and descriptions of drug abuse, sexually explicit conduct, and torture."
l8r, g8r (2007) by Lauren Myracle. (Offensive language; religious viewpoint; sexually explicit; unsuited to age group.)

Lady Chatterly's Lover (1928) by D.H. Lawrence ("Obscene." "4-letter words." "Sex scenes." "Filthy." "Smutty." "Degrading." "Offensive." "Disgusting." "Filthy words and passages."
Temporarily banned in the US and UK for violation of obscenity laws. Banned in Australia.)

Lajja (Shame) (1993) by Taslima Nasrin (Has created misunderstanding among communities. A fatwa was issued for Nasrin's death; she went into hiding. Banned in Bangladesh,
and a few states of India for anti-Islamic sentiments. Apart from Lajja, Taslima's first four autobiographical volumes had also been banned in Bangladesh.)

The Land (2001) by Mildred D. Taylor (Removed from the Turner Elementary School  media-center shelves in New Tampa, Florida [2008] as age-inappropriate. A parent challenged
the book because the novel contains a racial epithet. The book was a 2002 Coretta Scott King Author Award recipient.)

Land of the Free: A History of the United States (1967) by John W. Caughey, John Hope Franklin, and Ernest R. May ("Very distasteful, slanted, and objectionable."
"Negative." "Biased." "Racist." "Has numerous inaccuracies." "Runs America down.")

A Land Remembered (1984) by Patrick Smith (Challenged, but retained in the Indian River County Schools in Vero Beach, Florida in 2003 despite two parents' complaints about
racially offensive language. One of the parents said the book's use of the "N-word" created a hostile learning environment for his children.)

The Last Battle (1956) by C.S. Lewis, Pauline Baynes.

The Last Book In the Universe (2000) by Rodman Philbrick (Banned in Bellevue Union School District, California due to content about gangs.)

Last Exit to Brooklyn (1964) by Hubert Selby, Jr. ("Obscene and pornographic." "The effect of reading the book was to horrify, shock, disgust, and nauseate.")

The Lasting Scar by Andrew Osmond (Banned from publication in the UK.)

The Last Mission (1979) by Harry Mazer (Bad words.)

The Last of the Wine (1956) by Mary Renault (Homosexuality.)

Last Tango in Paris (1972) by Robert Ailey.

The Last Temptation of Christ (1953) by Nikos Kazantzakis (Heretical, blasphemous.)

The Lathe of Heaven (1971) by Ursula K. LeGuin.

Laughing Boy: A Navajo Love Story (1929) by Oliver LaFarge.

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Black Dossier (2007) by Alan Moore (Challenged at the Jessamine County Public Library in Nicolasville, Ky. [2009]. A petition with
950 signatures was presented to the board to overturn its collection policy. The petition specifically asked for the removal of four works on the grounds that they “offended me in that
they depict sexual acts and/or describe such acts in a way that in my opinion are contrary to the Jessamine County public opinion” of what should be in a public, taxpayer-supported
collection. The petition concluded the works constituted a public safety issue in that they encourage sexual predators. In addition to Moore’s graphic novel, the other works challenged
were
Snuff, by Chuck Palahniuk, Choke, a DVD based on a novel by Palahniuk; and the DVD Ron White: You Can’t Fix Stupid. The graphic novel eventually got two
employees fired for breaching library policies, the library director was threatened with physical harm, and the book was recatalogued, along with other graphic novels with mature
trends, to a separate but unrestricted graphic novels section of the library.)

The Learning Tree (1963) by Gordon Parks ("Objectionable material, swearing, obscene language, explicit detail of premarital sexual intercourse, other lewd behavior, specific
blasphemies against Jesus Christ and excessive violence and murder." "Indecent." "Contains vulgar and sexually explicit language, and descriptions of violent acts." Challenged on the
summer reading list at LeFlore High School in Mobile, Alabama [2006] because the author frequently used inappropriate words, such as "nigga," "bitch," "bastard," and "ass.")

Leaves of Grass (1855) by Walt Whitman (This famous collection of poetry was withdrawn in Boston in 1881, after the District Attorney threatened criminal prosecution for the use
of explicit language in some poems. The work was later published in Philadelphia. Obscene; too sensual.)

(B) Les Miserables (1862) by Victor Hugo (Listed in the Index Librorum Prohibitorum in Rome from 1864-1959; Voted out of a library in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania because it
mentioned a grisette.)

Le Morte D'Arthur (1485) by Sir Thomas Malory (Junk.)

Lesbian Kama Sutra (2004) by Kat Harding (Restricted minors’ access in the Topeka and Shawnee County, Kans. Public Library [2009] because the organization Kansans for
Common Sense contended that the material is “harmful to minors under state law.” Later the board voted 6–3 in favor of adopting a staff recommendation to keep the books where they
are currently located on the shelves in the library’s Health Information Neighborhood section.)

A Lesson Before Dying (1993) by Ernest Gaines (Removed from the college book store at Louisiana College, Pineville, Louisiana in 2004 by the college president because a love
scene described in the book clashes with the school's Christian values.)

Lessons from a Dead Girl (2007) by Jo Knowles (Johanna Beth) (Withdrawn from classroom use and the approved curriculum at the Montgomery County, Ky. High School
[2009], but available at the high school library and student book club. Some parents have complained about five novels containing foul language and cover topics — including sex, child
abuse, suicide, and drug abuse — unsuited for discussion in coed high school classes. They also contend that the books don’t provide the intellectual challenge and rigor that students
need in college preparatory classes. The titles appeared on suggested book lists compiled by the Young Adult Library Services Association, a division of the American Library Association,
for twelve- to eighteen-year-olds who are “reluctant readers.” The superintendent removed the book because it wasn’t on the pre-approved curriculum list and couldn’t be added by
teachers in the middle of a school year without permission.)

Less Than Zero (1985) by Bret Easton Ellis.

Liberace (1994) by Raymond Mungo (Gay related themes.)**

The Life and Works of Renoir (1994) by Janice Anderson (Because of nude paintings in the book.)

Life is Funny (2000) by E.R. Frank (Sexually explicit; X-rated passage describing two teens' first experience with sexual intercourse.)

A Light In the Attic (1981) by Shel Silverstein (Challenged at the Cunningham Elementary School in Beloit, Wisconsin (1985) because the book "encourages children to break
dishes so they won't have to dry them." Removed from the shelves of the Minot, North Dakota public school libraries in 1986 by the assistant superintendent "in anticipation of a
parent's complaint." The superintendent found "suggestive illustrations" on several pages. Challenged at the Big Bend Elementary school in Mukwonago, Wisconsin in 1986 because
some of Silverstein's poems "glorified Satan, suicide, and cannibalism, and also encouraged children to be disobedient." Challenged at the West AllisWest Milwaukee, Wisconsin school
libraries in 1986 because the book "suggests drug use, the occult, suicide, death, violence, disrespect for truth, disrespect for legitimate authority, rebellion against parents," and because
it inspires young people to commit "acts of violence, disbelief, and disrespect." Challenged at the elementary schools in the Papillion-La Vista School District in Omaha, Nebraska in 1986
because the book "promotes behavior abusive to women and children, suicide as a way to manipulate parents, mockery of God, and selfish and disrespectful behavior." Challenged at the
Appoquinimink schools in Middletown, Delaware in 1987 because the book "contains violence, idealizes death, and makes light of manipulative behavior." Challenged at the Moreno
Valley, California Unified School district libraries in 1987 because it "contains profanity, sexual situations, and themes that allegedly encourage disrespectful behavior." The poem "Little
Abigail and the Beautiful Pony" was banned from second-grade classes in Huffman, Texas in 1989 because a mother protested that it "exposes children to the horrors of suicide."
Challenged at the Hot Springs, South Dakota elementary school in 1989 as suitable classroom material because of its objectionable nature. Challenged at the South Adams, Indiana
school libraries in 1989 because the book is "very vile" and "contained subliminal or underlying messages and anti-parent material." Restricted to students with parental permission at
the Duval County, Florida public school libraries in 1992 because the book features a caricature of a person whose nude behind has been stung by a bee. Challenged at the Fruitland
Park Elementary School library in Lake County, Florida in 1993 because the book "promotes disrespect, horror, and violence." Challenged, but retained on the Webb City, Missouri
school library shelves in 1996. A parent had protested that the book imparts a "dreary" and "negative" message. The poem “Little Abigail and the Beautiful Pony” is morbid. Suggestive
illustrations.)*

Like Water For Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments, With Recipes, Romance, and Home Remedies (1989) by Laura Esquivel (Sexually explicit and inappropriate
material.)*

Lily's Ghost by Laura Ruby (Removed from the Pinellas, Florida school district and Hillsborough County, Florida fourth-grade reading list [2006], although the book is on the
Sunshine State Young Reader's Award list of books for third- through fifth-graders.)

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (1950) by C.S. Lewis (Challenged in the Howard County, Maryland school system in 1990 because it depicts "graphic violence, mysticism,
and gore.")*

(B) Lisey's Story (2006) by Stephen King.

The Listeners (1971) by Christopher Pike.

Listen to the Silence (1995) by David W. Elliott.

The Literary Experience (2007) by Bruce Beiderwell and Jeffrey M. Wheeler, eds. (Retained in the Grand Rapids, Michigan Advanced Placement English classes [2007] despite
considerations of returning the 1,846 page anthology to its publisher or clipping out about seventy pages with objectionable material, including a drama, "Topdog/Underdog" by Suzan-
Lori Parks that contained profanity and descriptions of sexual activity.)

Literature and Society: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Nonfiction (textbook) (2006) by Pamela J. Annas and Robert C. Rosen (Uses the word 'nigger'.)

Little Black Sambo (1899) by Helen Bannerman (Banned in Japan -- 1988-2005 to quell "political threats to boycott Japanese cultural exports" even though the pictures were not
those of the original version.)

The Little Foxes (1939) by Lillian Hellman.

Little House in the Big Woods (series 1932 -- 1943) by Laura Ingalls Wilder (Promotes racial epithets and is fueling the fire of racism.)*

Little House on the Prairie (1932 -- 1943) by Laura Ingalls Wilder (Challenged at the Lafourche Parish elementary school libraries in Thibodaux, Louisiana in 1993 because the
book is "offensive to Indians." Banned in the Sturgis, South Dakota Elementary school classrooms in 1993 due to statements considered derogatory to Native Americans.)*

The Little Mermaid (1837) by Hans Christian Andersen.*

Little Red Riding Hood (1812) retold by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm (An illustrated edition of this book was banned in two California school districts in 1989 because the book
shows the heroine taking food and wine to her grandmother. The school districts cited concerns about the use of alcohol in the story.)*

Little Red Riding Hood (1983) retold by Trina Schart Hyman (Banned because Red carries a bottle of wine in her basket for grandmama.)*

The Little Red Schoolbook (1969) by Søren Hansen and Jesper Jensen (Several politicians in many countries criticized the book, fearing that it would erode the moral fabric in
society and be an invitation for anarchy in schools. Banned in France and Italy. Subject of successful prosecution under the Obscene Publications Act, upheld by the Appeal Court and
subsequently the European Court of Human Rights.)

Lives of Girls and Women (1971) by Alice Munro.

(B) The Living Bible (1946) by William C. Bower.

Living Dead Girl (2008) by Elizabeth Scott (Challenged, but retained at the Effingham, Ill. Helen Matthes Library [2009] despite concerns about its graphic content and the
unsatisfactory ending. The book is about a fifteen-year-old’s perspective of living with her captor after being forcibly kidnapped and imprisoned at the age of ten. The book has received
several accolades from book critics.)

Living By the Word: Essays (1988, first edition) by Alice Walker.

Lolita (1955) by Vladimir Nabokov ("Reflected moral disintegration and reviled humanity." "Pedophilia." "Sheer unrestrained pornography." "Even a single little girl was likely to be
seduced as a result of its publication.")

The Lonely Girl (1962) by Edna O'Brien (Banned in Ireland in 1962 after Archbishop John Charles McQuaid complained personally to Justice Minister Charles Haughey that it
was "particularly bad.")

Longarm In Virginia City (1984) by Tabor Evans (Pornographic, sexual encounters.)

Long Day's Journey Into Night (1956) by Eugene O'Neill.

The Long Secret (1965) by Louise Fitzhugh (Book is demented.)

(B) The Long Walk (1979) by Richard Bachman (Stephen King).

Looking for Alaska (2005) by John Green (Challenged, but retained for the eleventh-grade Regents English classes in Depew, New York [2008] despite concerns about graphic
language and sexual content. The school sent parents a letter requesting permission to use the Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature novel and only three
students were denied permission to read the book.)

The Lorax (1971) by Dr. Seuss (Challenged in the Laytonville, California Unified school district in 1989 because the book "criminalizes the forest industry." Banned from schools in
parts of the US for being an allegorical political commentary.)*

Lord of the Flies (1954) by William Golding (Racist terminology.)

(B) Lord of the Rings (1937 -- 1949) by J.R.R. Tolkien (Burned in Alamagordo, New Mexico in 2001 outside the Christ Community Church along with other Tolkien novels as
satanic.)

The Lords of Discipline (1980) by Pat Conroy ("Vulgar language, sexual explicitness, violent imagery that is gratuitously employed." "Profanity and descriptions of sadomasochistic
acts.")

Lost Horizon (1933) by James Hilton.

Lost Prophet: The Life and Times of Bayard Rustin (2003) by John D'emilio (Has gay characters.)

The Lottery (1948) by Shirley Jackson (Banned in South Africa during Apartheid.)

Love and Other Four Letter Words (2000) by Carolyn Mackler (Talks about getting wasted.)

Love and Sex in Plain Language (1985) by Eric W. Johnson.

Love and Sex: Ten Stories of Truth (2001) by Michael Cart.

Love in the Time of Cholera (1985) by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

Love Is One of the Choices (1978) by Norma Klein.

The Lovely Bones (2002) by Alice Sebold (Challenged at the Coleytown Middle School library in Westport, Connecticut [2007]. The school superintendent acknowledged that the
book is "for mature readers" and also acknowledged that "the book is appropriate to be part of a middle-school library collection serving students from ages 11--14, many of whom possess
the maturity level to read this book. Moved to the faculty section of the John W. McDevitt Middle School Library in Waltham, Massachusetts [2008] because its content was too
frightening for middle school students.)*

Love Story (1970) by Erich Segal.

Lucky (1999) by Alice Sebold.*

Luna (2004) by Julie Ann Peters.

Lunch Poems (1964) by Frank O'Hara.
.
Lush (2006) by Natasha Friend (drugs, offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group)

Lysistrata (411 BC) by Aristophanes (Banned for decades from the US mail under the Comstock Law of 1873. Officially known as the Federal Anti-Obscenity Act, this law banned
the mailing of lewd, filthy, obscene, or indecent materials. The Comstock laws, while now unenforced, remain for the most part on the books today. The anti-war Lysistrata was banned
again in 1967 in Greece, which was then controlled by a military junta.)
Baby Be-Bop (1995) by Francesca Block ("Homosexual agenda." "Discussion of sex, exploration of gay teen lives, and profanities." "There are just plain too many teenager-aimed
books nowadays that have this sort of choppy, half-conscious, half-delirious, not quite stream of consciousness style of writing." "Offensive language." "Portrays an unconventional
family." "Pervasive vulgarity and obsessive obscenities." Four Wisconsin men belonging to the Christian Civil Liberties Union sought $30,000 apiece for emotional distress they suffered
from the West Bend, Wisconsin Community Memorial Library [2009] for displaying a copy of the book. The claim states that, "specific words used in the book are derogatory and
slanderous to all males" and "the words can permeate violence and put one's life in possible jeopardy, adults and children alike." The CCLU called for the public burning of the book.
Four months later, the library board unanimously voted 9-0 to maintain, "without removing, relocating, labeling, or otherwise restricting access," this and other books challenged in the
young adult section at the library.)

Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism (2008) by Ha-Joon Chan (Banned for distribution within the South Korean military as one of
23 books banned beginning August 1, 2008.)

(B) Bag of Bones (1998) by Stephen King.

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress (2000) by Dai Sijie ("Sexually explicit.")

(B) Bambi: A Life in the Woods (1923) by Felix Salten (Banned in Nazi Germany because it was "a political allegory on the treatment of Jews in Europe." Many of the copies of the
book were burned.)

Banned From Public Radio: Humor, Commentary, and Smart Remarks Your Government Doesn't Want You to Hear (1991) by Michale Graham.

Baseball Saved Us (1993) by Ken Mochizuki (Challenged, but retained on the second-grade reading list in the New Milford, Connecticut schools [2006] despite the fact the word
"Jap" is used to taunt the main character in the book. The children's story is about the World War II Japanese-American internment.)

The Bastard (1974) by John Jakes.

Bastard of Istanbul (2006) by Elif Shafak (Prize-winning novelist went on trial in Istanbul, Turkey [2006], accused of belittling Turkishness. The novel had been at the top of
Turkish bestsellers lists since its publication, but its treatment of the mass murder of Ottoman Armenians in 1915 angered government officials.)

Bastard Out of Carolina (1993) by Dorothy Alison.

Beach Music (1995) by Pat Conroy (Suspended from the Nitro High School, Kanawha County, West Virginia honors English and Advanced Placement Literature classes [2007]
after parents complained about the book's scenes of violence, sexual assault, child rape, suicide, and more. A Kanawha County Board of Education member suggested the institution of a
book rating system. Eventually the book was approved for return to the classroom, as long as students are offered alternate texts.)

The Bean Trees (1988) by Barbara Kingsolver ("Vulgar language, sexual explicitness, violent imagery that is gratuitously employed." Challenged at the William S. Hart Union
High School District in Saugus, Calif. [2009] as required summer reading for the honors English program because the novel includes sexual scenes and vulgar language. Students have
the option of alternative assignments that still meet objectives and teaching goals.)

Beautiful Retard (2002) by Matthew Hansen ("Offensive title.")

(B) Becoming Visible: An Illustrated History of Lesbian and Gay Life in the 20th Century (1998) by Molly McGarry, Fred Wasserman, and Mimi Bowling.

The Beet Fields: Memories of a Sixteenth Summer (2002) by Gary Paulsen.

Before You Were a Baby (Let's Read-and-Find-Out Science) (1968) by Paul and Kay Showers.

Beijing Doll (2002) by Chun Sue.

The Bell Jar (1963) by Sylvia Plath *first published under the pen name Victoria Lucas ("Contains sexual material and advocates an objectionable philosophy of life." "Poor-
quality literature and stresses suicide, illicit sex, violence and hopelessness." "Inappropriate because it spoke of a diaphragm and used profanity." "School decisions should be based on
the absolutes of Christian behavior.")*

Beloved (1987) by Toni Morrison ("Offensive language, sexual content, and unsuited to age group." Retained in the Northwest Suburban High School District 214 reading list in
Arlington Heights, Illinois [2006], along with eight other challenged titles. A board member, elected amid promises to bring her Christian beliefs into all board decision-making, raised
the controversy based on excerpts from the books she'd found on the Internet. Pulled from the senior Advanced Placement English class at Eastern High School in Louisville, Kentucky
[2007] because two parents complained that the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about antebellum slavery depicted the inappropriate topics of bestiality, racism, and sex. The principal
ordered teachers to start over with
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne in preparation for upcoming AP exams. Challenged in the Coeur d'Alene, Idaho School District
[2007]. Some parents say the book, along with five others, should require parental permission for students to read them.)

The Bermudez Triangle (2006) by Maureen Johnson (Challenged at the Leesburg, Florida Public Library [2009] because of sexual innuendo, drug references, and other adult
topics.)

The Best Short Stories by Negro Writers (1967) by Langston Hughes.

Betrayed (2007) by P.C. Cast and Kristen Cast (Challenged in the North Star Borough School District, Fairbanks, Alaska school libraries [2011] because, "It simply causes kids to
think even more of things sexual." The teenage vampire novel is part two of the "House of Night" series.)

Be True to Your School: A Diary of 1964 (1964) by Bob Greene.

Between Lovers (2001) by Eric Jerome Dickey ("Homosexual agenda.")

The BFG (1982) by Roald Dahl.

(B) Bhavsagar Granth (2000?) by Baba Piara Singh Bhaniara (possibly other authors; or just edited by Bhaniara; controversial, unknown) (Banned in Punjab, India
because it was deemed heretical by orthodox Sikhs.)

(Book AND Authors were burned) The Bible (William Tyndale, who partially completed translating the Bible into English, was captured, strangled, and burned at the stake (1536)
by opponents of the movement to translate the Bible into the vernacular. "Not of the Muslim faith." In 1631, a misprint left the word 'not' out of the 7th commandment (thou shalt not
commit adultery -- resulting in the "wicked Bible" edition. Many translations of the Bible were banned by the Index Librorum Prohibitorum in the Catholic church. Banned in the USSR
for anti-religious reasons. Removed from numerous libraries and banned from import in the USSR from 1926 to 1956. Many editions of the Bible have also been banned and burned by
religious and civil authorities throughout history. On July 1, 1996, in Singapore, a woman was convicted for possessing the Jehovah's Witness translation of the Bible. A 2000 US
government report reported that Burma (Myanmar) bans all Bible translations into local indigenous languages.)*

Big River, Big Sea -- Untold Stories of 1949 (2009) by Lung Ying-tai.

Biko (1978) by Donald Woods ("Criticism of apartheid system." Banned in South Africa for it' criticism of white government.)

Black Beauty (1877) by Anna Sewell ("Racist." "Use of the word 'black' in title." Banned by South Africa's apartheid regime.)*

Black Boy: Record of Childhood and Youth (1944) by Richard Wright ("Vulgar language, sexual explicitness, violent imagery gratuitously employed." "Subversive." "Black Boy
should be taken off the shelves of stores." "Sales should be stopped."  "It was a damnable lie, from beginning to end." "It built fabulous lies about the South. The purpose of the book was
to plant seeds of hate and devilment in the minds of every American. It was the dirtiest, filthiest, most obscene, filthy and dirty, and came from a Negro from whom one could not expect
better." Banned in Mississippi; California; Nashua, NH; Island Trees, NY for being anti-catholic, anti-semitic, anti-Christian and obscene. Challenged in the Howell, Michigan High
School [2007] because of the book's strong sexual content. In response to a request from the president of the Livingston Organization for Values in Education, or LOVE, the county's top
law enforcement official reviewed the books to see whether laws against distribution of sexually explicit materials to minors had been broken. "After reading the books in question, it is
clear that the explicit passages illustrated a larger literary, artistic, or political message and were not included solely to appeal to the prurient interest of minors," the county prosecutor
wrote. "Whether these materials are appropriate for minors is a decision to be made by the school board, but I find that they are not in violation of the criminal laws.")

Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War (1999) by Mark Bowden (Removed from a classroom at Central Lafourche High School in Raceland, Louisiana [2008] for violating the
district policy on cursing. The book is the story of a failed Special Forces mission in Somalia.)

(B) Black House (2001) by Stephen King.

Black Like Me (1960) by John Howard Griffin ("Obscene." "Integration centered, vulgar, filthy, and unsuitable for any age level." "Four-letter words." "Because it is obscene and
vulgar and because of black people being in the book.")

Black Poets (1971) by Dudley Randall.

Blankets (2003) by Craig Thompson ("Mature themes of turbulent childhoods, strict religious upbringings, and homosexuality." Challenged in the Marshall, Missouri public library
[2006] because the book was deemed "pornographic" by some members of the community. The book was moved to the adult book section, rather than the young-adult area where it had
been shelved before.)

(B) Bless Me, Ultima (1972) by Rudolfo A. Anaya ("Profanity." “Pagan content.” Banned from the Orestimba High School's English classes in Newman California [2008] by the
superintendent after complaints that the book is profane and anti-Catholic. Teachers claimed that the superintendent circumvented the district's policies on book challenges and set a
dangerous precedent. The book is about a boy maturing, asking questions about evil, justice, and the nature of God.)

The Blind Owl (1937) by Sadegh Heydayat (The widely acclaimed Iranian classic, written in the 1930s, was banned in Iran [2006]. "The new government intends to take positive
steps for reviving neglected values and considering religious teachings in the cultural field.")

Bling Bling: Hip Hop's Crown Jewels (2005) by Minya Oh (Retained with limited access at the Maplewood Middle School Library in Menasha, Wisconsin [2008]. The book for
reluctant readers contains photographs and interviews with rap artists and focuses on how hip-hop taste for flashy jewelry typifies their musical and cultural evolution of the last 25
years. In addition to retaining the book, board members voted unanimously to adopt procedures intended to secure and record parental consent before limited access books are released
to students.)

Blood and Chocolate (1997) by Annette Curtis Klause ("School district needs to review their policies.")

Bloods: An Oral History of the Vietnam War by Black Veterans (1984) by Terry Wallace.

Blossom Culp and the Sleep of Death (1986) by Richard Peck.

(B) The Bloudy Tenent of Persecution (1644) by Roger Williams.

Blubber (1974) by Judy Blume (Removed from all library shelves in the Montgomery County, Maryland elementary schools in 1980. Temporarily banned in Sunizona, Arizona in
1981. Challenged in the Des Moines, Iowa schools in 1983 due to  "objectionable subject matter." Challenged at the Smith Elementary School in Del Val, Texas in 1983 because it
contains the words "damn" and "bitch" and showed children cruelly teasing a classmate. Challenged at the Xenia, Ohio school libraries in 1983 because the book "undermines authority
since the word 'bitch' is used in connection with a teacher." Challenged at the Akron, Ohio School District libraries in 1983. Restricted at the Lindenwold, New Jersey elementary school
libraries in 1984 because of "a problem with language." Banned, but later restricted to students with parental permission at the Peoria Illinois School District libraries in 1984 because of
its strong sexual content and language and alleged lack of social or literary value. Removed from the Hanover, Pennsylvania School District's elementary and secondary libraries in
1984, but later placed on a restricted shelf at the middle school libraries because the book was "indecent and inappropriate." Challenged at the Casper, Wyoming school libraries in 1984.
Challenged as profane, immoral, and offensive, but retained in the Bozeman Montana school libraries in 1985. Challenged at the Muskego, Wisconsin Elementary School in 1986
because"the characters curse and the leader of the taunting of an overweight girl is never punished for her cruelty." Challenged at the Perry Township, Ohio elementary school libraries
in 1991 because in the book, "bad is never punished. Good never comes to the fore. Evil is triumphant.")

The Blue Lotus (1934 -- "Le Lotus Bleu) by Herge ("Pro-Kuomintang view and support.")

The Bluest Eye (1970) by Toni Morrison (Challenged, but retained at the Kern High School district in Bakersfield, California in 2003 despite complaints of the book's sexually
explicit material; objectionable language. Challenged in the Howell, Michigan High School [2007] because of the book's strong sexual content. In response to a request from the
president of the Livingston Organization for Values in Education, or LOVE, the country's top law enforcement official reviewed the books to see whether laws against the distribution of
sexually explicit materials to minors had been broken. "After reading the books in question, it is clear that the explicit passages illustrated a larger literary, artistic, or political message
and were not included solely to appeal to the prurient interests of minors," the county prosecutor wrote. "Whether these materials are appropriate for minors is a decision to be made by
the school board, but I find that they are not in violation of criminal laws." Retained in the Delphi Indiana Community High School's curriculum [2009] despite claims of inappropriate
sexual content and graphic language.)

B-More Careful (2001) by Shannon Holmes.

The Body of Christopher Creed (2000) by Carol Plum-Ucci (Challenged but retained in the Appleton, Wisconsin Area School District 9th-grade curriculum [2010] despite concerns
about age appropriateness.)

Bone (2004) by Jeff Smith (Retained in the Rosemount, Minnesota elementary school libraries [2010] despite a parent's concern that the series contains smoking, drinking, and
gambling in its graphics and storyline.)

Bones in the Cliff (1995) by James Stevenson.

Bonnie Joe, Go Home (1972) by Jeannette Eyerly.

Bony Legs (1983) by Joanna Cole ("Magic and witchcraft.")

The Book of Bunny Suicides: Little Fluffy Rabbits Who Just Don't Want To Live Anymore (2003) by Andy Riley (Retained at the Central Linn High School library in
Halsey, Oregon [2008].  The 2003 book depicts cartoon rabbits killing themselves in various ways, from sitting in front of a bobsled run to impaling themselves on Darth Vader's light
saber. A parent complained about the book, saying initially she would burn it rather than return it. The story drew national attention and prompted readers to send the school district
about 24 copies of the book.)

The Book of Mormon.

The Book of Phoebe
(1985) by Mary-Ann Tirone.

The Bookseller of Kabul (2002) by Asne Seierstad (Challenged, but retained on Wyoming, Ohio high school district’s reading list [2009] despite concerns about its sexual content.
After a second challenge to a different title, the district reviewed all books on reading lists. Staff members rated each book on its relationship to the course, its uniqueness, its
appropriateness, and the extent to which it “could create controversy among students, parents, and community groups." Removed from Roosevelt High School's library and classrooms in
Wyandotte, Michigan [2008] because it is "too sexually explicit.” The book is a nonfiction account of what life is like inside an Afghan household. The school said the book went through
several reviews and was approved for high school students before being placed on the assigned reading list for the class.)

The Book Your Church Doesn't Want You to Read (1995) by Tim C. Leedom, Ed. ("Astrological and mythical origins of western religions.")

Borstal Boy (1958) by Brendan Behan (Banned in Ireland in 1958. Believed to have been banned because of its critique of Irish republicanism and the Catholic Church, and its
depiction of adolescent sexuality. Also banned in Australia and New Zealand. New Zealand allowed it to be published there, after all, in 1963. --
wikipedia)

Boss: Richard J. Daley of Chicago (1971) by Mike Royko ("Downgrades police departments.")

(B) Boston: A Documentary Novel of the Sacco-Vinzetti Trial (1978) by Upton Sinclair.

The Botany of Desire (2001) by Michael Pollan (Retained on the Buffalo Grove, Illinois High School [2006], along with eight other challenged titles. A board member, elected amid
promises to bring her Christian beliefs into all board decision-making, raised the controversy based on excerpts from the books she'd found on the Internet.)

The Boy Book: A Study of Habits and Behaviors, Plus Techniques for Taming Them (2006) by E. Lockhart(Challenged in the Keller, Texas Independent School District
[2009] because some say it is "too adult for young eyes.")

Boys and Sex (1971) by Wardell Pomero ("Urges pre-adolescent boys and girls to experiment with multiple sexual partners." "Explicit." "Deals with bestiality, masturbation, and
homosexuality, and endorses pre-adolescent and premarital sex." "Promotes prostitution, promiscuity." "Sordid, suggestive, permissive type of approach.")

Boy's Life (1991) by Robert McCammon.

The Boy Who Lost His Face (1989) by Louis Sachar ("Unsuitable words." "Profanity, frequent use of obscene gestures, and other inappropriate subject matter." "The age level and
use of some swear words may make it inappropriate to younger children.")

(B) The Brass Check (1919) by Upton Sinclair.

Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley (Challenged, but retained in the South Texas Independent School District in Mercedes, Texas in 2003. Parents objected to the adult
themes -- sexuality, drugs, and suicide -- found in the novel. Huxley's book was part of the summer Science Academy curriculum. The board voted to give parents more parents more
control over their children's choices by requiring principals to automatically offer an alternative to a challenged book. "Sordid, immoral, and obscene"; "depressing, fatalistic, and
negative, and encourages students to adopt a lifestyle of drugs, sex, and conformity, reinforcing helpless feelings that they can do nothing to make an impact on their world;" "vilifies the
family, sexuality, suicide, drugs." Retained in the Coeur d'Alene, Idaho School District [2008] despite objections that the book has too many references to sex and drug use. Challenged
at the North County High School in Glen Burnie, Maryland [2010] by a small group of parents who circulated a petition to have the book removed from use by county schools over
concerns about explicit sexual content. Retained on the list of approved materials that Seattle, Washington high school teachers may use in their language arts curriculum [2011]. A
parent had complained that the book has "a high volume of racially offensive derogatory language and misinformation on Native Americans. In addition to the inaccurate imagery, and
stereotype views, the text lacks literary value which is relevant to today's contemporary multicultural society.")*

Breaking Boxes (2002) by A.M. Jenkins.

Brideshead Revisited (1944) by Evelyn Waugh ("Homosexuality.")

Bridge to Terabithia (1977) by Katherine Paterson (The Newbery Award winning book was challenged as a sixth grade recommended reading in the Lincoln, Nebraska schools in
1986 because it contains profanity, including the phrase 'Oh, Lord' and "Lord" used as an expletive. Challenged as suitable curriculum material in the Harwinton and Burlington,
Connecticut school in 1990 because it contains language and subject matter that set bad examples and give students negative views of life. Challenged at the Apple Valley, California
Unified School District (1992) because of vulgar language. Challenged at the Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania Area School District in 1992 because of profanity and references to
witchcraft. Challenged and retained in the libraries, but will not be required reading at the Cleburn, Texas Independent School district in 1992 because of profane language. A
challenge in Oskaloosa, Kansas in 1993 led to the enactment of a new policy that requires teachers to examine their required material for profanities. Teachers will list each profanity
and the number of times it was used in the book, and forward the list to parents, who will be asked to give written permission for their children to read the material. Challenged in the
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania schools in 1993 because of offensive language. Challenged at the Medway, Maine schools in 1995 because the book uses "swear words." Removed from the
fifth grade classrooms of the New Brighton Area School District in Pulaski Township, Pennsylvania in 1996 due to profanity, disrespectful of adults, an elaborate fantasy world which
might lead to confusion."  Challenged in the middle school curriculum in Cromwell, Connecticut in 2002 due to concern that the book promotes witchcraft and violence. "Uses swear
words and deals with sorcery." "References to witchcraft.")*

The Brimstone Journals (2004) by Ronald Koertge (Challenged but retained at the William Chrisman High School library in Independence, Missouri [2007]. A parent was
concerned about profanity as well as some of the subjects discussed in the book.)

Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six MIT Students Who Took Las Vegas for Millions (2002) by Ben Mezrich ("Gambling." "Sexual content." "Prostitution.")

Brokeback Mountain (1997) by Annie Proulx.

Brown Bear Brown Bear What Do You See? (1967) by Bill Martin, Jr. and Eric Carle (Bill Martin, Jr. was mistaken for Bill Martin [a philosophy professor at DePaul
University in Chicago] who wrote a 2008 book called Ethical Marxism: The Categorical Imperative of Liberation. The State Board of Education in Texas, a la member Pat Hardy [R-
Weatherford], cited that books by Bill Martin, Jr. [who died in 2004] wrote books for adults that contain "very strong critiques of capitalism and the American system." All of Bill Martin,
Jr. books were banned.)

(B) Buddhist Holy Writs.

Bumps in the Night
(1999) by Harry Allard.

Burger's Daughter (1979) by Nadine Gordimer ("Endangers the safety of the state." "Indecent." Banned in South Africa in 1979 for going against the government's racial policies
but the ban was reversed in October of the same year.)

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee (1970) by Dee Brown ("If there is the possibility that something might be controversial, why not eliminate it?" "Slanted.")

Buster's Sugartime (2006) by Marc Tolon Brown (Challenged, but retained at the Union, Oklahoma district elementary school libraries [2009] despite a parent's complaint that the
book features two same-sex couples and their children.)
Daddy's Roommate  (1991) by Michael Wilhoite ("Legitimizes gay relationships." "A skillful presentation to the young child about lesbianism/homosexuality." "Vile, sick, and goes
against every law and constitution." "Promotes a dangerous and ungodly lifestyle from which children must be protected." "Intent is indoctrination into a gay lifestyle." "Words are age
inappropriate.")*

Dakar -- The Story of the Israeli Submarine Unit (1996) by Mike Eldar (The book was banned in 1997 by a district court, due to an alleged charge according to the "Official
Secret Act" following the ban of Eldar's previous book, "Flotilla II" regardless of the fact it had been approved by the Israeli military censor and despite the fact that over 2000 copies had
been sold. Eldar was accused of "espionage," his home was searched, his website was shut down, and his computer and documents were confiscated. Following a 4-year legal struggle,
the book was released and all charges against Eldar were dropped.)

The Dallas Titans Get Ready for Bed (1988) by Karla Kuskin (Illustrates and converses about jockstraps.)

Dance On My Grave: A Life and Death in Four Parts (1982) by Aidan Chambers (Gay-positive themes; **.)

Dancing At the Rascal Fair (1987) by Ivan Doig (Challenged at the Coeur d'Alene, Idaho School District [2007] because sexual descriptions in the book were not appropriate. Some
parents say the book, along with five others, should require parental permission for students to read them.)

Dangerous Girls (2003) by R.L. Stine.

(B) The Dark Half (1989) by Stephen King.

(B) The Dark Pilgrimage (1987) by Jakob Wasserman.

(B) The Dark Tower (series) (1982 -- 2012) by Stephen King.

Das Kapital (1867) by Karl Marx.

Daughters of Eve (1979) by Lois Duncan (Profanity; sexual content.)

The Da Vinci Code (2003) by Dan Brown (Banned in Egypt [2006]. The culture minister told Parliament, "We ban any book that insults any religion. We will confiscate this book."
Parliament was debating the book at the request of several Coptic Christian members who demanded a ban because, "It's based on Zionist myth, and it contains insults towards Christ,
and it insults the Christian religion and Islam." Banned in Iran [2006].)*

(B) The Dawn of Humanity (1919) by Kurt Pinthus.

The Day After Tomorrow (also known as Sixth Column) (1941) by Robert A. Heinlein  (Removed from the Beardstown, Illinois High School Library [2008]. A parent requested
its removal and a committee determined the novel "rather adult in nature" and, because the library already had a large selection of other valuable science fiction and spy literature, the
committee elected to remove the book from the high school's curriculum and donated it to the public library.)

The Day No Pigs Would Die (1972) by Robert Newton Peck (Banned from the St. Lawrence School in Utica, Michigan [1997] because of a passage involving pig breeding. The
teacher quit her job over the banning of the novel.)

Dead Birds Singing (1985) by Marc Talbert.

Dead Folks (1996) by Jon A. Jackson (Challenged in the Big Sky High School in Missoula, Montana [2009] because the local author's work was viewed as too graphic in its
discussion of sex.)

Deadline (2007) by Chris Crutcher (Withdrawn from classroom use and the approved curriculum at the Montgomery County, Ky. High School [2009], but available at the high
school library and student book club. Some parents have complained about five novels containing foul language and covering topics — including sex, child abuse, suicide, and drug
abuse — unsuited for discussion in coed high school classes. They also contend that the books don’t provide the intellectual challenge and rigor that students need in college preparatory
classes. The titles appeared on suggested book lists compiled by the Young Adult Library Services Association, a division of the American Library Association, for twelve- to eighteen-
year-olds who are “reluctant readers.” The superintendent removed the book because it wasn’t on the pre-approved curriculum list and couldn’t be added by teachers in the middle of a
school year without permission.)

Deadly Deceits (My 25 Years in the CIA) (1983) by Ralph McGheehee (CIA objected to 397 passages which delayed publication of this book for three years.)

The Dead Man in Indian Creek (1990) by Mary Downing Hahn (Challenged at the Salem-Keizer School District, Oreg. elementary schools [2010] because of the drugs and drug
smuggling activities in the book. The book was previously challenged in 1994 in the same school district because of graphic violence, examples of inappropriate parenting and because it
was too frightening for elementary students. The book has won awards from the International Reading Association, the Children’s Book Council, and the American Library Association.)

(B) Dead Zone (1979) by Stephen King.

Deal With It! A Whole New Approach to Your Body, Brain, and Life as a Gurl (1999) by Esther Drill ("Gay-positive themes." ** Challenged at the West Bend, Wisconsin
Community Memorial Library [2009] as being "pornographic and worse than an R-rated movie." The library board unanimously voted 9-0 to maintain, "without removing, relocating,
labeling, or otherwise restricting access" the books in the young adult category at the library. The vote was a rejection on a four-month campaign conducted by the citizen's group West
Bend Citizens for Safe Libraries to move fiction and nonfiction books with sexually explicit passages from the young adult section to the adult section and label them as containing
sexual material.)

The Dear One (1991) by Jacqueline Woodson.

Death Be Not Proud (1949) by John Gunther.*

Death of a Salesman (1949) by Arthur Miller.

Death of a President, November 20 -- November 25, 1963 (1967) by William Manchester.

The Death of Lorca (1973) by Ian Gibson (Banned briefly in Spain.)

Deathwatch (1972) by Robb White.

(B) Decameron (Prencipe Galeotto) (probably 1350 -- 1353) by Giovani Boccaccio (Banned for decades from the US mail under the Comstock Law of 1873. Officially known as
the Federal Anti-Obscenity Act, this law banned the mailing of lewd, filthy, obscene, or indecent materials. The Comstock laws, while now unenforced, remain for the most part on the
books today. Eight of the 100 stories are purely erotic, while the others deal with social criticism, the outwitting of someone by another, and criticism of nuns and priests; obscene, lewd,
and lascivious book of indecent character.)

Decent Interval: An Insider's Account of Saigon's Indecent End Told By the CIA's Chief Strategy Analyst in Vietnam (1977) by Frank Snepp (Banned in the US because
the author had published material that, as a former CIA employee, he was not allowed to publish.)

Deenie (1973) by Judy Blume (Challenged by a parent in the Spring Hill Elementary School district in Hernando County, Florida in 2003 due to passages that talk frankly about
masturbation. The board decided to retain the title, but require students to have written parental permission to access the novel.)

(B) Delores Claiborne (1992) by Stephen King.

Desire Lines (1997) by Jack Gantos.

Desire Under the Elms (1958) by Eugene O'Neill.

(B) Desperation (1996) by Stephen King.

Detour For Emmy (1993) by Marilyn Reynolds.

The Devil: Opposing Viewpoints (1992) by Thomas Schouweiler (Challenged at the Chestnut Ridge Middle School in Washington Township, Pennsylvania in 2004. The
complainants want the school district to seek parental approval before elementary and middle school students can check out books related to the occult.)

The Devil's Alternative (1979) by Frederick Forsyth.

The Devil's Discus (1964) by Rayne Kruger (Banned in Thailand in 2006.)

The Devil's Storybook (1974) by Natalie Babbie (Challenged at the Chestnut Ridge Middle School in Washington Township, Pennsylvania in 2004. The complainants want the
school district to seek parental approval before elementary and middle school students can check out books related to the occult.)

Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems, Ptolemaic and Copernican (1632) by Galileo Galilei (Banned by Pope Urban VIII for heresy and breach of good faith
(1633); an Inquisition verdict of Galileo said that he was "vehemently suspected of heresy, namely of having believed and held the doctrine which is false and contrary to the sacred and
divine scriptures that the sun is the center of the world and does not move from East to West and that the earth moves and is not the center of the world and that an opinion may be
held and defended as probable after it has been declared and defined to be contrary to Holy Scripture." Galileo recanted: "With sincere heart and unpretended faith I abjure, curse, and
detest the aforesaid errors and heresies and also every other error and sect whatever, contrary to the Holy Church, and I swear that in the future I will never again say or assert
verbally or in writing, anything that might cause a similar suspicion toward me." And then he muttered, "And yet it [the earth] moves.")

Diamond Dogs (2001) by Alan Watts.

Diary of a Frantic Kid Sister (1985) by Hila Colman.

Dictionary of American Slang (1960) by T.Y. Crowell, publisher (Over 150 dirty passages.)

Dictionary of Modern Serbo-Croatian Language by Miloš Moskovljević (Banned in Yugoslavia by court order in 1966 at request of Mirko Tepavac, because "some definitions
can cause disturbance among citizens." --
wikipedia)

Did Six Million Really Die? (1974) by Ernst Zundel (In the 1980s, Ernst Zundel was convicted twice under Canada's "false news" law for publishing this book, a 1974 book denying
the Holocaust. On appeal, the Canadian Supreme Court found the false news law unconstitutional in 1992, but Zundel was then prosecuted under Canada's "Human Rights Act" for
publishing this book and other material. Previously banned in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, and most of mainland Europe, Germany, and Austria in particular, for
Holocaust denial.)

(B) Different Seasons (1982) by Stephen King ("Oral sex and prison rape scenes." "It does not meet the standards of the community.")

Dinky Hocker Shoots Smack (1972) by M.E. Kerr.

The Diviners (1974) by Margaret Laurence.

Doctor Zhivago (1957) by Boris Pasternak (Anti-Bolshevik stance; banned in the USSR in 1988.)*

Doing It (2003) by Melvin Burgess (Homosexual agenda.)

Doll Baby (2000) by Eve Bunting, Catherine Stock.

A Doll's House (1879) by Henrik Ibsen (Propagates feminist views.)

Don Quixote (full title The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha) (1605 and 1615) by Saavedra Miguel de Cervantes (For the sentence, "Works of charity
negligently performed are of no worth.")

Don't Call Me Brother by Austin Miles (A vitriolic attack on organized Christianity.)

Don't Play Dead Before You Have To (1971) by Maia Wojciechowska.

Don't You Dare Read This, Mrs. Dumphrey (1996) by Margaret Peterson Haddix (Banned from the Galt Joint Union Elementary School district classrooms in Sacramento,
California in 2003 and restricted to students with parental permission in the middle school libraries. The novel discusses parental neglect, sexual harassment at an after-school job, and
other stresses experienced by the young adult fictional character; risqué themes and language. The book is on the American Library Association Best Books for Young Adults.)*

Doris Day: Her Own Story (1975) by Doris Day and A.E. Hotchner.

Double Date (1994) by R.L. Stine (Removed from the Crawford, County Georgia Middle School in 2003 because the book deals with complex issues that teenagers confront.)

Down These Mean Streets (1967) by Piri Thomas.

Dracula (1897) by Bram Stoker (The book contains unacceptable descriptions in the introduction, such as ‘Dracula is the symptom of a wish, largely sexual, that we wish we did not
have.")*

Dragon Ball: The Monkey King by Akira Toriyama (Removed from the Wicomico County, Md. school media centers [2009] because the Japanese graphic novels depict some
violence and show nudity.)

Dragonwings (1975) by Lawrence Yep (Challenged at the Apollo-Ridge schools in Kittanning, Pennsylvania (1992) because of the frequent use of the word 'demon' in the book. The
Newbery Award winning book might encourage children to "commit suicide because they think that they can be reincarnated as something or someone else." On September 15, 1992,
Judge Joseph Nickleach denied a request seeking to ban the book from the district's curriculum. In his opinion, Nickleach wrote: "The fact that religions and religious concepts are
mentioned in school does not automatically constitute a violation of the establishment clause." Graphic violence, profanity, reference to demons and prostitution, and alcohol and drug
use depicted in a positive light.)

(B) The Drawing of the Three (1987) by Stephen King.

Draw Me a Star (1992) by Eric Carle (Challenged in the elementary school libraries in the Edmonds, Washington School District in 1996. The book is illustrated with highly stylized
representations of a naked woman and man.)*

(B) Dreamcatcher (2001) by Stephen King.

Dreamland (2000) by Sarah Dessen.

Droll Stories (1823--1837) by Honore de Balzac (Banned for obscene material of a sexual nature in Canada in 1914 and Ireland in 1953; the ban was lifted in Ireland in 1967. -
wikipedia)

The Drowning of Stephan Jones (1997) by Bette Greene ("Gay-positive themes." **; "Pervasive vulgarity and obsessive obscenities." "Condones illegal activities." "[Book] is like a
rattlesnake that needed to be killed right then and right there.")

Druids (1991) by Morgan Llwelyn (Depictions of oral sex and rape.)

Dry White Season (1979) by Andre Brink (Anti-apartheid.)

Dwikhandita (Split in Two) (2003) (Published in Bangladesh under the title Ka) by Taslima Nasrin.
The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big Round Things (2003) by Carolyn Mackler (Sexual content, anti-family, offensive language, and unsuited to age group.)

Earth's Children (1980) by Jean M. Auel.

Earth Science (textbook) ("Teaches the theory of evolution exclusively. It completely avoids any mention of Creationism ...The evolutionary propaganda also underminds {sic} the
parental guidance and teaching the children are receiving at home and from the pulpits.")

East of Eden (1952) by John Steinbeck (Ungodly and obscene.)*

Eat Me (1997) by Linda Jaivin (Removed from the Marion County Public Library in Ocala, Florida in 2003. The library director noted that the Australian best seller was removed
because the library lacks a designated erotica collection and the novel met only three of 17 criteria used to evaluate books for acquisition. The county's Public Library Advisory Board
recommended that the library director retain the novel. The board's vote was only a suggestion and the final decision went back to the library's director. In February of 2004, the
director reversed her earlier decision, reinstated the novel, and stated that her personal dislike for the book overshadowed her objectivity and adherence to policy. "Sexually explicit.")

The Education of Harriet Hatfield (1989) by May Sarton ("About gays and lesbians." A teacher fired for refusing to remove the book.)

E for Ecstasy (1993) by Nicholas Saunders (Book is about the drug MDMA. Seized by Australian customs in 1994.)

The Egypt Game (1967) by Zilpha Keatley Snyder (Shows children in dangerous situations, condones trespassing and lying to parents and ostensibly teaches about the occult.
Challenged as part of a reading list in a fourth-grade class at Southern Hills Elementary School in Wichita Falls, Tex. [2009] because the book includes scenes depicting
Egyptianworship rituals. The Newbery Award-winning book has been an optional part of the school district’s curriculum for years. “I’m not going to stop until it’s banned from the school
district. I will not quiet down. I will not back down. I don’t believe any student should be subjected to anything that has to do with evil gods or black magic,” said the student’s father.)

Eight Seconds (2000) by Jean Ferris (Gay positive themes. **)

The Elephant's Child (1902) by Rudyard Kipling (Challenged in the Davenport, Iowa community school district in 1993 because the book is "99% violent." Throughout the book,
when the main character, an elephant child, asks a question, he receives a spanking instead of answers.)

Ellen Foster (1987) by Kay Gibbons.

(B) El Senor Presidente (1946) by Miguel Angel Asturias ("Subversive." Banned in Guatemala because it went against the ruling political leaders.)

The Emperors Jones (1920) by Eugene O'Neill.

Empress of the World (2007) by Sara Ryan.

The Encyclopedia of Serial Killers (2001) by Michael Newton (Challenged and retained in the Hillsborough County, Florida school district in 2002 over a parent's objections to
the book's "gruesome details.")

End as a Man (1947) by Calder Willingham.

(B) Enola Gay (2000) by Mark Levine.

Erotic Innocence: The Culture of Child Molesting (1998) by James Russell Kincaid (Challenged, but retained in the Montgomery County, Texas library system in 2002 after a
conservative Christian group, the Republican Leadership Council, characterized the book as "helping to lay the culture of child molesters and homosexuals.")

Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690) by John Locke (Rxpressly forbidden to be taught at Oxford University in 1701.)

Essays (1580) by Michel de Montaigne.

(B) Established Beliefs of Epicurus.

(B) Etrusca Disciplina.

Existentialism and Human Emotions
(1957) by Jean-Paul Sartre.

Exodus (1971) by Leon Uris.*

The Exorcist (1971) by William P. Blatty.*

Exploring Life Through Literature.

Extreme Elvin
(1999) by Chris Lynch (Removed from the Crawford County, Georgia Middle School library in 2003 because the book deals with complex issues that teenagers
confront.)

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (2005) by Jonathan Safran Foer (Challenged in the Richland, Washington School District [2010]. Used in 10th grade honors language
arts class at Hanford High, the book tells the story of Oskar Schell, a boy whose father died in the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks. The book contains profanity, sex, and descriptions of
violence.)

(B) The Eyes of the Dragon (1987) by Stephen King.
(B) Macbeth (between 1603 -- 1607) by William Shakespeare (In 1999, a teacher at the Windsor Forest High School in Savannah, Georgia required seniors to obtain permission
slips before they could read this play. The School Board had pulled the play from school reading lists, citing "adult language" and references to sex and violence. Many students and
parents protested the decision, which also included the outright banning of three other of Shakespeare's plays. "Obscene language.")*

Madame Bovary (1856) by Gustave Flaubert ("Indecent." "Offenses against public morals.")

The Making of Dr. Truelove (2006) by T.A. Baron (Removed from the Liberty High School in Bedford County, Virginia [2007] because of "sexual explicit content." Administrators
pulled the book from the shelf after a parental complaint. While the school system's general policy on content challenges calls for a formal committee's review of the book, that policy was
not followed.)

The Malay Dilemma (1970) by Mahathir bin Mohamad (Criticism of May 13 incident and UMNO. Banned in Malaysia for its criticism of UMNO and the May 13 incident. But the
ban was lifted when Dr. Mahathir himself was made the 4th Prime Minister of Malaysia.)

(B) Mammonart (1925) by Upton Sinclair.

Manchild in the Promised Land (1965) by Claude Brown ("Graphically realistic." "Filth and obscenity." "Violent, the language offensive, and women are degraded." "Students have
no reason to understand life in a black ghetto.")

The Manchurian Candidate (1959) by Richard Condon (Political reasons.)

Manga: 60 Years of Japanese Comics (2004) by Paul Gravett (Removed from all branches of the San Bernardino County, California Library [2006] because "there are a couple of
pretty graphic scenes, especially one showing sex with a big hamster, that are not especially endearing to our community standards.")

(B) Manifesto of the Communist Party (1848) by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels (Communist propaganda.)

Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988) by Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman (The Turkish Chief Public Prosecution Office decided
to prosecute two publishers that released the book because it "degrades the Turkish identity and the Turkish Republic, and fuels hatred and discrimination among the people." The
publishers could face up to six years in prison if found guilty.)

The Man Who Came To Dinner (1939) by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart.

(B) Mar Morto (1936) by Jorge Amado.

Marijuana Grower's Guide (1978) by Mel Frank and Ed Rosenthal (Challenged at the Teton County public library in Jackson, Wyoming in 2004 because "tax dollars are being
used to purchase a how-to crime manual;" drugs.)

Marlene Dietrich (1994) by W.K. Martin (*)

The Martian Chronicles (1950) by Ray Bradbury (Profanity and the use of God's name in vain.)

Martina Navratilova (1995) by Gilda Zwerman (**; The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Southern California filed suit in Doe vs Anaheim Union High School District
alleging that the removal is "a pretext for viewpoint-based censorship." The ACLU claims no other books have been removed from the library for similar reasons, even though several,
such as works by Shakespeare and Dickens, are more difficult reading. The ACLU contends that the school officials engaged in unconstitutional viewpoint discrimination by removing
the book because it contains gay and lesbian material. In March 2001, the school board approved a settlement that restored the book to the high school shelves and amended the
district's policy to prohibit the removal of books for subject matter involving sexual orientation, but the book will not be returned to the middle school.)

(B) Martin Eden (1909) by Jack London.

(B) The Mass Psychology of Fascism (1945) by Wilhelm Reich.

Mastering Multiple Position Sex (2009) by Eric Marlowe Garrison (Challenged, but retained at the Pataskala, Ohio Public Library [2009]. The library determined to implement
a new juvenile library card. A parent or guardian will be able to sign off on the card, thereby restricting his or her child’s borrowing rights to juvenile materials.)

Matilda (1988) by Roald Dahl.
.
Maurice (1971) by E.M. Forster ("Homosexuality.")

The Mayor of Casterbridge (1886) by Thomas Hardy.

McTeague (1899) by Frank Norris.

Mein Kampf  (1925) by Adolph Hitler (Nazi; hate literature; banned due to anti-Nazi laws, however, possession and sale for historical reasons is legal in Germany, Austria, and the
Netherlands. Plans by German scholars to reprint as an academic treatise were rejected by the state copyright holders [2009], who said a new edition of the book could fuel support for
far-right groups. The Bavarian authorities reaffirmed a sixty-four-year-old ban on the book after the Munich-based Institute of Contemporary History, or IFZ, applied for permission to
reprint the work.)

Member of the Wedding (1946) by Carson McCullers (Not appropriate for younger schoolmates.)

Memoirs of Hecate County (1946) by Edmund Wilson ("The most salacious and lascivious work issued for indiscriminate circulation.")

Me, Penelope (2007) by Lisa John-Clough (Challenged in the middle school library in Tavares, Florida [2008]. The book is part of a collection that requires permission from the
school librarian to check it out. Objections centered on the book's depiction of a sixteen-year-old who is dealing with the death of her brother and reference to sexual experimentation.)

Mephisto (1936) by Klaus Mann (In 1968, Gustaf Grundgens' adopted son Peter Gorski sued Nymphenburger Verlagsbuchhandlung, then the publisher of Mephisto in West
Germany. The Federal Constitutional Court of Germany ruled that Grundgens' personal freedom (Article 2 of the Basic Law) was more important than the freedom of art (Article 5).)

(B) The Merchant of Venice (between 1596 and 1598) by William Shakespeare (Banned from classrooms in Midland, Michigan in 1980, due to its portrayal of the Jewish
character Shylock. It was similarly banned in the 1930s in schools in Buffalo and Manchester, New York. Many of Shakespeare's plays were "cleansed" of crude words and phrases.)*

(B) The Meritous Price of Our Redemption (1650) by William Pynchon (The first book banned in the "New World." Pynchon was a leader of the Massachusetts Bay Colony who,
in 1636, founded the city of Springfield, Massachusetts beside the Connecticut River. He wrote this explicit criticism of Puritanism, published in London in 1650. His book was burned
on the Boston Common. Pynchon was accused of heresy by the Massachusetts General Court. Pynchon transferred ownership of his lands to his son, and then left the New World to go
back to England. --
wikipedia)

Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary edited by the Merriam-Webster Editorial Staff (Pulled from the Menifee, Calif. Union School District [2010] because a parent
complained when a child came across the term “oral sex.” Officials said the district is forming a committee to consider a permanent classroom ban of the dictionary.)

A Message to Man and Humanity by Aleksandar Cvetković (Banned in Yugoslavia by court order in 1967 for "false and wicked claims, and enemy propaganda that supports pro-
Chinese politics.)

The Metamorphosis (1915) by Franz Kafka (Banned in Nazi Germany.)

Meyebela: My Bengali Girlhood (1998) by Taslima Nasrin.

Mick Harte Was Here (1996) by Barbara Park (Inappropriate themes.)

(B) A Middle English Vocabulary (1922) by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1994) by John Berendt (Banned for just four days from the Beulah, North Dakota High School library [2008]. Two school employees
followed school policy to request removing the book after their son brought it home from an accelerated-reading program, in which students could choose from a couple of hundred titles.
The parents said that the 1994 runaway nonfiction best seller was too pornographic and at odds with student behavior promoted in the school handbook. The board reversed its decision
at the encouragement of the board president, who said the board moved too fast and unleashed a possible court case it would never win. He said there might be more palatable
alternatives, like creating a list of restricted books that parents have to approve before their children can check them out. A decision to review school policies and investigate less-
restrictive means to control library books was approved by the school board.)

Midnight's Children (1981) by Salman Rushdie.

Military Inc.: Inside Pakistan's Military Economy (2007) by Ayesha Siddiqa (Banned for a short time in Pakistan.)

The Miller's Tale (~end of the 14th century) by Geoffrey Chaucer (Pornography and women's lib.)

Mirandy and Brother Wind (1988) by Patricia McKissack (Challenged at the Glen Springs Elementary School in Gainesville, Florida in 1991 because of the use of black dialect.)

(B) Mirror of the Polish Crown (1618) by Sebastian Miczynski (In the anti-Jewish riots in Cracow; it was burned by Sigismund III Vasa.)

(B) Misery (1987) by Stephen King.

Mission to Moscow (1941) by Joseph F. Davies (Communist propaganda.)

Mississippi Bridge (1990) by Mildred D. Taylor (Challenged, but retained at the Donahoe Elementary School library in Sandston, Virginia in 2001 despite objections of its "negative
content and that it's riddled with prejudice." The novel, by a Newbery Medal award-winning author tells the story of a young black man who tries to save white passengers in a bus
accident, despite being ordered to give up his seat to "white folks.")

Mississippi: Conflict and Change (1974) by James W. Loewen and Charles  Sallis.

Miss Julie: A Naturalistic Tragedy (1888) by Johan August Strindberg.

Mister Roberts (1946) by Thomas Heggen.

Moby Dick (1851) by Herman Melville (Challenges values within the community.)

Moll Flanders (1722) by Daniel Defoe (Banned for decades from the US mail under the Comstock Law of 1873. Officially known as the Federal Anti-Obscenity Act, this law banned
the mailing of lewd, filthy, obscene, or indecent materials. The Comstock laws, while now unenforced, remain for the most part on the books today. )

Mom the Wolf Man and Me (1972) by Norma Klein.

Mommy Laid an Egg! or, Where Do Babies Come From? (1994) by Babette Cole (Moved to the children's section of the Camden County, Missouri library in 1998 because the
book explains birth process from conception to delivery.)

Monster (1999) by Walter Dean Myers (Vulgar language, sexual explicitness, and violent imagery gratuitously employed.)

Monsters: 21 Stories of the Most Fantastic and Gruesome Creatures of All Time -- With Exercises for Developing Critical Reading Skills (1985) by Dan Dramer.

Montana 1948 (1993) by Larry Watson (Profanity and descriptions of nudity and sex crimes.)

The Moon is Down (1942) by John Steinbeck (Banned in Nazi Germany and Nazi-occupied countries during World War II. Distributed illegally by various resistance movements.)

More Joy of Sex (1975) by Alex Comfort (Sexual.)

A More Perfect Union: Why Straight America Must Stand Up for Gay Rights (1994) by Richard D. Mohr (Homosexuality destroys marriage and families; it destroys the good
health of the individual and the innocent are infected by it.)

More Scary Stories To Tell in the Dark (1984) by Alvin Schwartz and Stephen Gammell ("Would cause children to fear the dark, have nightmares, and give them an
unrealistic view of death." "Too scary." "Violence and cannibalism." "Unacceptably violent for children." "Shows the dark side of religion through the occult, the devil, and Satanism.";
Retained in the Greater Clark County, Kentucky elementary school libraries [2006] despite a grandmother's request to ban the Scary Stories books written by Alvin Schwartz. She
wanted all four or five volumes in the series banned because, she said, they depict cannibalism, murder, witchcraft, and ghosts; and include a story about somebody being skinned.)*

Mother Goose: The Old Nursery Rhymes (2011) illustrated by Arthur Rackham.*

The Mountain Wreath (1847) by Petar II Petrović Njegoš (Banned in Bosnia schools by Carlos Westendorp.)

The Moves Make the Man (1984) by Bruce Brooks.

My Brother Has AIDS (1994) by Deborah Davis (AIDS.**)

My Brother Sam is Dead (1974) by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier (Challenged at the Gwinnett County, Georgia School libraries in 1984 because some of its
characters use profanity. An abridged version with the profanity deleted has been substituted in the elementary school libraries. Removed from the curriculum of fifth grade classes in
New Richmond, Ohio in 1989 because the 1974 Newbery Honor book contained the words "bastard," "goddamn," and "hell" and did not represent "acceptable ethical standards for fifth
graders." Challenged in the Greenville County, South Carolina schools in 1991 because the book uses names of God and Jesus in a vain and profane manner along with inappropriate
sexual references. Challenged in the Walnut Elementary Schools in Emporia, Kansas in 1993 by parents who said it contained profanity and graphic violence. Removed from fifth grade
classes at Bryant Ranch Elementary School in the Placentia-Yorba Linda, California Unified School District in 1994 because, "book is not G-rated. Offensive language is offensive
language. Graphic violence is graphic violence, no matter what the context." Challenged due to its profanity and violence, but retained at the Palmyra, Pennsylvania area schools in
1994. Challenged in the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado in 1996 because of the "persistent usage of profanity" in the book, as well as references to rape,
drinking, and battlefield violence. Retained in the Antioch, California Elementary school libraries in 1996 after a parent complained about the novel's profanity and violence. Retained
in all Muscogee County, Georgia elementary school libraries [2009] despite a parent's concerns about profanity in the book.)

My Brother's Hero (2002) by Adrian Fogelin (Removed from the Hillsborough County, Florida fourth-grade reading list [2006], although it is on the Sunshine State Young
Reader's Award list of books for third- through fifth-graders.)

My Father's Scar: A Novel (1996) by Michael Cart (Homosexual agenda.**)

My Friend Flicka (1941) by Mary O’Hara (Uses the word “bitch” to refer to a female dog, as well as the word “damn.”)

My Heartbeat (2002) by Garret Freymann-Weyr (Homosexual agenda.**)

My House (1972) by Nikki Giovanni.

My Losing Season (2002) by Pat Conroy.
.
My Mom's Having a Baby (2005) by Dori Hillestad Butler (Challenged in the Carrollton, Texas library [2011] because it is inappropriate for children. The book won an Editor's
Choice award from Bookfest in 2005 and was named a Top Ten Sci-Tech book for Youth by Booklist. Retained at the Hillsborough County, Florida Public Library System [2011].)

My Secret Life (1888) by "Walter" (pseudonym) (Banned for erotic content.)

My Sister's Keeper (2004) by Jodi Picoult (Pulled from classrooms in Clawson, Michigan [2008] as too racy for middle school students. The novel is the story of a young girl who sues
her parents because they want her to donate a kidney to her sister.)
I Am the Cheese (1977) by Robert Cormier ("Humanistic and destructive of religious and moral beliefs and of national spirit." "Offensive language." "Slyly casts doubt on the US
government, parental authority, and the medical profession.")

I Been In Sorrow's Kitchen and Licked Out All The Pots (1993) by Susan Straight.

Iceman (1994) by Chris Lynch.

The Idolators (1973) by William Hegner.

Iggie's House (1970) by Judy Blume.

I Have To Go (1987) by Robert Munsch.

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969) by Maya Angelou (Challenged as required reading for Hamilton, Montana freshman English classes in 2002. At issue were the scenes in
which the author explores her sexuality through intercourse as a teenager and the depiction of a rape and molestation of an 8-year-old girl. Homosexuality is another theme explored in
the book that has drawn criticism; racism, profanity; vulgar language, sexual explicitness, or violent imagery that is gratuitously employed. ** Retained in the Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
High school sophomore advanced English class [2006]. Parents objected to teens reading Angelou's account of being brutally raped by her mother's boyfriend and an unwanted
pregnancy later in life. Parents will receive notification and be allowed to decide whether or not they approve of its use by their children, according to recommendations agreed upon by
a review committee and parents who objected to the use of the book. Challenged in the Manheim Township, Pennsylvania schools [2007] due to sexual references. The book was
retained in the ninth-grade English curriculum, but it was decided to teach the book later in the school year, after a public forum was held with parents to discuss the book and the
entire literary canon of the English department. Challenged in the Coeur d'Alene, Idaho School District [2007]. Some parents say the book, along with five others, should require
parental permission for students to read them. Restricted to students with parental permission at the Ocean View School District middle school libraries [2009] because the "book's
contents were inappropriate for children." Challenged in the Newman-Crows Landing, California School District [2009] on a required reading list presented by the Orestimba High
English Department. A trustee questioned the qualifications of Orestimba staff to teach a novel depicting African American culture.)*

I Like Guys: A Short Story from Naked (1997) by David Sedaris (Pulled from a Litchfield, N.H. Campbell High School elective course classroom [2009] after parents voiced their
concerns about a short-stories unit called “Love/Gender/Family Unit” that dealt with subject matters including abortion, cannibalism, homosexuality, and drug use. The parents said the
stories promoted bad behavior and a “political agenda” and they shouldn’t be incorporated into classroom teachings. The Campbell High School English curriculum adviser said the short
story was selected not only for its tone and style, but also its message of respect and acceptance, not for advocating homosexuality. The English curriculum adviser eventually resigned.)

The Illustrated Guide to Extended Massive Orgasm (2002) by Steve Bodansky (Wanna wager a bet on a guess why this one is banned? Challenged, but retained in the Marple
public library in Broomall, Pennsylvania in 2004 along with several sexual instruction manuals including:
The Joy of Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein and Edmund White; Great
Sex Tips
by Anne Hooper; Ultimate Guide to Fellatio by Violet Blue; and Sex Toys 101: A Playfully Uninhibited Guide by Rachel Venning because the books are
"seriously objectionable in text and pictures due to the sexually explicit material.")

I Love You, Stupid (1981) by Harry Mazer.

I'm Mad At You: Verses (1978) compiled by William Cole.

Impressions (HOW I Wonder) (1984) by Jack Booth.

In a Dark Dark Room And Other Scary Stories (1985) by Alvin Schwartz (Too morbid for children.)

In Cold Blood (1966) by Truman Capote.*

In Country (1985) by Bobbie Ann Mason (Retained in the Delphi, Indiana Community High School's curriculum [2009] despite claims of inappropriate sexual content and graphic
language.)

Indian in the Cupboard (1980) by Lynne Reid Banks (The school librarian at the Suwannee County, Florida Elementary School in 1993 routinely erased words from books deemed
objectionable. In this instance, the words "hell" and "heck" were removed. Removed from the Bemidji Minnesota school district voluntary reading list and from the school library shelves
in 1995 because it contains subtle stereotypes inconsistent with district diversity goals.)*

In Dubious Battle (1936) by John Steinbeck.

I Never Promised You a Rose Garden (1964) by Joanne Greenburg.

Infallible? An Inquiry (1970) by Hans Kung.

(B) The Inferno (1308 -- 1321) by Dante (Ciardi translation).~*

Inside Russia Today (1957) by John Gunther.

(B) Insomnia (1994) by Stephen King.

(B) Interpretation(s) by Upton Sinclair.

In the Company of Crazies (2006) by Nora Raleigh Baskin (Banned in Catoosa City, Georgia middle schools.)

In the Country of Ourselves (1971) by Nat Hentoff.

In the Heat of the Night (1965) by John Ball.

In the Middle of the Night: The Shocking True Story of a Family Killed in Cold Blood (2009) by Brian McDonald (Challenged at the Cheshire, Conn. Public Library [2009].
McDonald’s book revisits 2007, when Joshua Komisarjevsky and Steven Hayes allegedly invaded the Cheshire home of Dr. William Petit, beating him with a baseball bat and raping,
torturing, and murdering his wife and two daughters. Complainants want the book kept off the library shelves until the men accused of the crime have been tried.)

In the Night Kitchen (1970) by Maurice Sendak (Removed from the Norridge, Illinois School library in 1977 due to "nudity for no purpose." Expurgated in Springfield Missouri in
1977 by drawing shorts on the nude boy. Challenged at the Cunningham Elementary School in Beloit, Wisconsin in 1985 because the book desensitizes children to nudity. Challenged
at the Robeson Elementary School in Champaign, Illinois in 1988 because of nudity. Challenged at the Elk River, Minnesota schools in 1992 because reading the book "could lay the
foundation for future use of pornography." Challenged at the El Paso, Texas public library in 1994 because "the little boy pictured did not have any clothes on and it pictured his private
area." Challenged in the Wake County, North Carolina schools [2006]. Parents are getting help from Called2Action, a Christian group that says its mission is to "promote and defend our
shared family and social values.")*

In the Rabbit's Garden (1975) by Leo Lionni (Challenged at the Naas Elementary School library in Boring, Oregon in 1986 because the story about two rabbits living in a lush
garden paradise make a mockery of the Bible's tale of Adam and Eve. Unlike the story of Adam and Eve, Lionni rewards his bunnies for eating the forbidden fruit by allowing them to
live happily ever after. "Shallow; manipulative." "Lacking in intelligence and responsibility.")

In the Spirit of Crazy Horse (1980) by Peter Matthiessen.

In the Time I Get (story in Athletic Shorts) (1989) by Chris Crutcher (AIDS.)

Intruder in the Dust (1948) by William Faulkner.

Invisible Man (1952) by Ralph Ellison.

(B) The Iron Heel (1907) by Jack London.

Ironman (1995) by Chris Crutcher.

I Saw Esau: The Schoolchild's Pocket Book (1947) by Iona Archibald Opie and Peter Opie (Challenged at the Cedar Grove Elementary School in Murfreesboro, Tennessee
[2007]. The complainant stated, "I understand that it is a book of poetry, but there is a fine line between poetry art and porn and this book's illustrations are absolutely offensive in
every way." The book is a collection of schoolyard jokes, riddles, insults, and jump-rope rhymes and is illustrated by Maurice Sendak.)*

Islam: A Concept of Political World Invasion (2003) by R.V. Bhasin (Banned in Maharashtra, India in 2007 on the grounds that it promotes communal disharmony between
Hindus and Muslims. --
wikipedia)

(B) It (1986) by Stephen King.

It's Not the End of the World (1972) by Judy Blume.

It's Okay If You Don't Love Me (1977) by Norma Klein.

It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health (1994) by Robie H. Harris (Challenged but retained in the children's section of the Mexico-
Audrain County, Missouri library in 1997. A Baptist minister complained not only about the title, but also about other "material concerning sensitive family issues, such as sexuality, the
death of a loved one, or the birth process. Challenged but retained at the Fargo, North Dakota Public library in 1997. The statement requested the book's removal cited the book as "too
explicit, pornographic, and too easily accessible to children." Challenged but retained in the Montgomery County, Texas library systems in 2002 after a conservative Christian group, the
Republican Leadership Council, characterized the book as "vulgar" and trying "to minimize or even negate that homosexuality is a problem." Relocated from the young adult to the adult
section of the Fort Bend School District's media centers after a resident sent an e-mail message to the superintendent expressing concern about the book's content. The Spirit of Freedom
Republican Women's Club petitioned the superintendent to have it, along with It's So Amazing, moved because they contain "frontal nudity and discussion of homosexual relationships
and abortion;" sexually explicit; vulgar; marriage is mentioned once in the whole book, while homosexual relationships are allocated an entire section; sex education; Retained in the
Lewiston, Maine Public Library [2008] after a patron refused to return the book due to her objections to its content. Other patrons donated four copies of the book, which remain in
circulation in the library. The patron said she was "sufficiently horrified by the illustrations and sexually graphic, amoral, abnormal contents." A police investigation found the library
did not violate the town ordinance against obscenity, and the patron who removed the book from the library will stand trial for theft.)*

It's So Amazing! A Book About Eggs, Sperm, Birth, Babies, and Families (1999) by Robie H. Harris, Michael Emberley (Relocated from the young adult to the adult section
of the Fort Bend School District's media centers after a resident sent an e-mail message to the superintendent expressing concern about the book's content. The Spirit of Freedom
Republican Women's Club petitioned the superintendent to have it, along with
It's Perfectly Normal, moved because they contain "frontal nudity and discussion of homosexual
relationships and abortion.")

I Was a Teenage Fairy (2000) by Frances Lia Block. (**)
Halloween ABC (1990) by Eve Merriam, Lane Smith (Challenged at the Douglas County Library in Roseburg, Oregon in 1989 because the book encourages devil worshipping.
Challenged at the Howard County, Maryland school libraries in 1991 because "there should be an effort to tone down Halloween and there should not be books about it in the schools."
Challenged in the Wichita Kansas public schools because it is "satanic and disgusting." Challenged at the Acres Green Elementary School in Douglas County, Colorado in 1992.
Challenged but retained, but will be shelved in the Othello, Washington elementary school libraries in 1993 because the book "promotes violent criminal and deviant behavior.
Challenged but retained at the Ennis, Texas public library in 1993. Challenged in the Cameron elementary school library in Rice Lake, Wisconsin in 1993. Challenged in the Spokane,
Washington school district library in 1994 by a father who found the poems to be morbid and satanic. In particular, the parent disapproved of one poem which "appears to be a chant
calling forth the Devil." Challenged in the Sandwish, Massachusetts public library in 1995 because it is too violent for young children. "Poems promote Satanism, murder, and suicide.")*

(B) Hamlet (~1599) by William Shakespeare (In 1999, a teacher at the Windsor Forest High School in Savannah, Georgia required seniors to obtain permission slips before they
could read this play. The School Board had pulled the play from school reading lists, citing "adult language" and references to sex and violence. Many students and parents protested the
decision, which also included the outright banning of three other of Shakespeare's plays. "Obscene language.")*

The Hammer of Eden (1998) by Ken Follett.

The Handmaid's Tale (1985) by Margaret Atwood ("Sexual encounters." The Judson, Texas school district board overruled [2006] Superintendent Ed Lyman's ban of the novel from
an advanced placement English curriculum. Lyman had banned the book after a parent complained it was sexually explicit and offensive to Christians. In doing so, he overruled the
recommendation of a committee of teachers, students, and parents. The committee appealed the decision to the school board.)

Hang-ups, Hook-ups, and Holding Out: Stuff You Need to Know About Your Body, Sex, and Dating (2007) by Melisa Holmes, MD and Trish Hutchinson, MD (Retained
in the Galway, New York Public Library [2008] after complaints about the book's "factual errors, philosophy, and perceived bias." A review of the book by the library determined that
the book received excellent reviews and contained no factual errors.)

Happy Endings Are All Alike (1978by Sandra Scoppettone.

Happy Endings: The Tales of a Meaty-Breasted Zilch (2007) by Jim Norton (Available upon request, but not placed in general circulation at the Jackson-George Regional
Library system in Pascagoula, Mississippi [2007] after complaints that the comedian's best selling book is "garbage and doesn't belong in a library.")

The Happy Prince and Other Stories (1888) by Oscar Wilde (Distressing and morbid.)

Harriet the Spy (1964) by Louise Fitzhugh (Teaches children to spy.)

Harris and Me (1993) by Gary Paulsen (Restricted at the Icicle Middle School library in Leavenworth, Washington for almost a decade [2008].)

(B) Harry Potter (series) (1997 -- 2007) by J.K. Rowling ("Tells kids that lying, cheating, and stealing are cute and acceptable." "A masterpiece of Satanic deception." "Witchcraft."
"Stupid." "Homosexuality." "Profanity." "Anti-Christian." "A filthy, filthy book." "Have a serious tone of death, hate, lack of respect, and sheer evil." "Contain lying and smart-aleck
retorts to adults." Proposed for removal, along with 50 other titles by a teachers' prayer group at the high school in Russell Springs, Kentucky in 2002 because the book deals with
ghosts, cults, and witchcraft. Parents of a Cedarville, Arkansas fourth grader (2002) filed a federal lawsuit challenging restricted access to the books-- students are required to present
written permission from a parent to borrow the books; the novel was originally challenged because it characterizes authority as "stupid" and portrays "good witches and good magic." A
federal judge overturned this restriction. Challenged in Moscow, Russia in 2002 by a Slavic cultural organization that alleged the stories about magic and wizards could draw students
into Satanism. Challenged but retained in the New Haven, Connecticut schools in 2003 despite claims the series "makes witchcraft and wizardry alluring to children." The Gwinnet
County, Georgia school board, in 2006, rejected a parent's pleas to take Harry Potter books out of school libraries, based on the claim that they promote witchcraft. The Georgia Board of
Education ruled December 14 that the parent had failed to prove her contention that the series "promotes the Wicca religion" and therefore that the book's availability in public schools
does not constitute advocacy of a religion. On May 29, 2007, Superior Court judge Ronnie Batchelor upheld the Georgia Board of Education's decision to support local school officials.
County school board members have said the books are good tools to encourage children to read and to spark creativity and imagination. Removed from the St. Joseph School in
Wakefield, Massachusetts [2007] because the themes of witchcraft and sorcery were inappropriate for a Catholic school. Removed by the Wilsona School District trustees from a list
recommended by a parent-teacher committee for the Vista San Gabriel California Elementary School library [2006] along with 23 other books. Trustees said one rejected book contained
an unsavory hero who made a bad role model for children; another was about a warlock, which they said was inappropriate; and others were books with which they were unfamiliar
and didn't know whether they promoted good character or conflicted with textbooks. Rejected titles included three bilingual
Clifford the Big Red Dog books, Disney's Christmas
Storybook
, two books from the Artemis Fowl series, Beauty is a Beast, California: Welcome to the USA, and the Eye of the Warlock. The Wilsona School District board
approved new library book-selection guidelines in wake of the trustee's controversial decision. Books now cannot depict drinking alcohol, smoking, drugs, sex, including "negative
sexuality, implied or explicit nudity, cursing, violent crime or weapons, gambling, foul humor, and dark content.") Series includes
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
(Philosopher's Stone)
, 1997; Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, 1998; Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, 1999; Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,
2000;
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, 2003; Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, 2005; and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, 2007)*

The Haunting of America: Ghost Stories From Our Past (1973) by Jean Anderson.

Headless Cupid (1971) by Zilpha Keatley Snyder (Challenged at the Hays, Kansas public library in 1989 because the book "could lead young readers to embrace Satanism."
Retained in the Grand Haven, Michigan school libraries in 1990 after a parent objected to the book because it "introduces children to the occult and fantasy about immoral acts." The
Newbery Award-winning book was retained on the approved reading list at Matthew Henson Middle School in Waldorf, Maryland in 1991 despite objections to its references to
witchcraft. Challenged in the Escondido, California school in 1992 because it contains references to the occult.)

The Headless Horseman Rides Tonight: More Poems to Trouble Your Sleep (1980) by Jack Prelutsky (Challenged at the Victor Elementary school media center in Rochester,
NY in 1982 because it "was too frightening for young children to read.")

Headman (1975) by Kin Platt.

Heart of Darkness (1902) by Joseph Conrad.

Heather Has Two Mommies (1989) by Leslea Newman ("A skillful presentation to the young child about lesbianism/homosexuality." "The subject matter is obscene and vulgar and
the message is that homosexuality is okay." "Vile, sick, and goes against every law and constitution." "Promotes a dangerous and ungodly lifestyle from which children must be
protected." "We could put together a resolution to amend the Georgia state constitution to say that tax dollars cannot be used to promote homosexuality, pedophilia, or sadomasochism.")*

(B) The Heptaméron (1558) by Queen Marguerite of Navarre.

A Hero Aint Nothin' But a Sandwich (1973) by Alice Childress (Anti-American, immoral.)

Heroes (1998) by Robert Cormier. (**)

The Heroin Diaries: A Year in the Life of a Shattered Rock Star (2007) by Nikki Sixx and Ian Gittins (Pulled from an optional supplemental reading list in an Advanced
Placement psychology course in Brooksville, Florida Hernando High School [2010] because of complaints about explicit language, descriptions of drug use, and photos. Written by the
former bassist for the band Mötley Crüe, it is a cautionary tale about the dangers of drug use.)

Hey Dollface (1989) by Deborah Hautzig (Gay-positive themes. **)

(B) The Hidden Face of Eve: Women in the Arab World (1980) by Nawal El Saadawi.

Hills Like White Elephants: A Short Story: The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway (1927) by Ernest Hemingway (Pulled from a Litchfield, N.H. Campbell High
School elective course classroom [2009] after parents voiced their concerns about a short-stories unit called “Love/Gender/Family Unit” that dealt with subject matters including abortion,
cannibalism, homosexuality, and drug use. The parents said the stories promoted bad behavior and a “political agenda” and they shouldn’t be incorporated into classroom teachings. The
Campbell High School English curriculum adviser eventually resigned.)

(B) Hindu Holy Writs.

Hippolytus
(428 BCE) by Euripides.

His Dark Materials (trilogy) (1995 -- 2000) by Philip Pullman.

(B) A History of Tom Jones. a Foundling (1749) by Henry Fielding.

Hit Man (1998) by Lawrence Block.

The Hoax of the Twentieth Century: The Case Against the Presumed Extermination of European Jewry (1976) by Arthur R. Butz.

(B) The Hobbit (1937) by J.R.R. Tolkien.*

Hold Fast (1978) by Kevin Major.

Holly's Secret (2000) by Nancy Garden (Gay-positive themes.**)

(B) The Holy Bible ("On religious grounds." "Lewd, obscene, indecent, offensive, violent, and dangerous to women.")*

The Homo Handbook: Getting In Touch With Your Inner Homo: A Survival Guide for Lesbians and Gay Men (1996) by Judy Carter (Homosexual agenda.)

Hoops (1981) by Walter Dean Myers (Challenged in the Council Bluff, Iowa schools [2009] because it contains "derogatory remarks, racial slurs, and sexual content.")

Horse (1992) by Juliet Clutton-Brock (Challenged at the Smith Elementary School in Helena, Montana in 2004 because a concerned parent "believes it promotes evolution.")

The Hot Zone (1994) by Richard Preston (Vulgar language, sexual explicitness, and violent imagery gratuitously employed.)

(B) House of Glass (Rumah Kaca) (1988) by Pramoedya Ananta Toer.

House of Night (series) (2007 -- ) by P.C. Cast and Kristin Cast (Banned at Henderson Junior High School in Stephenville, Texas Independent School District [2009]. The entire
teen vampire series was banned for sexual content and nudity. Since the series has not been completed, "Stephenville ISD actually banned books that have not yet been published and
perhaps even books that have yet to be written. There is no way the district could know the content of these books, and yet they have been banned.")

The House of the Spirits (1982) by Isabel Allende (Challenged, but retained in the advanced English classes in Modesto, California in 2003. The seven-member Modesto City School
Board said administrators should instead give parents more information about the books their children read, including annotations of each text. Parents can opt their children out of any
assignment they find objectionable. "Defames the Catholic faith and contains pornographic passages." "Immoral and sexually depraved." "Parents need more information.")

The House on Mango Street (1984) by Sandra Cisneros.

The House With a Clock in Its Walls (1973) by John Bellairs.

The House Without a Christmas Tree (1974) by Gail Rock. (Uses 'damn'.)

How Babies are Made (1968) by Andrew C. Andry and Steven Schepp.

How Do You Spell Abducted? (2002) by Cherylyn Stacey.

(B) How I Became a Socialist (1912) by Helen Keller.

Howl and Other Poems (1955) by Allen Ginsberg (The words and the sense of the writing is obscene -- you wouldn't want your children to come across it.)

How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents (1991) by Julia Alvarez (** Retained in the Northwest Suburban High School District 214 reading list in Arlington Heights, Illinois
[2006], along with eight other challenged titles. A board member, elected amid promises to bring her Christian beliefs into all board decision-making, raised the controversy based on
excerpts from the books she'd found on the Internet. Removed from Johnston County, North Carolina school libraries [2007] after a parent challenged its sexual content and profane
language. The county school's staff then launched a district-wide book title review.)

How to Eat Fried Worms (1973) by Thomas Rockwell.

How to Get Suspended and Influence People (2007) by Adam Selzer (Challenged at the Nampa, Idaho Public Library [2009] by a parent appalled that the cover included an
abstract drawing of a nude woman and the back cover contains some profanity. The book explores the theme of censorship through the eyes of a gifted eighth-grader who is suspended
after making an avant-garde sex-education video for a class project.)

How to Make Disposable Silencers (1984) by Desert and Eliezer Flores (An example of a class of books banned in Australia that "promote, incite, or instruct in matters of crime
or violence." --
wikipedia)

How to Make Love Like a Porn Star: A Cautionary Tale (2004) by Jenna Jameson and Neil Strauss (Sexually explicit.)

How You Were Born (1984) by Joanna Cole.

The Hunger Games (2008) by Suzanne Collins (Challenged and presented to the Goffstown New Hampshire school board [2010] by a parent claiming that it gave her 11-year-old
nightmares and could numb the other students to the effects of violence. Anti-ethnic; anti-family; insensitivity; offensive language; occult/ Satanic; violence))
(B) Gargantua and Pantagruel (~1532 -- 1564) by Francis Rabelais.

Gates of Fire (1998) by Steven Pressfield (Retained in the Fairfax County, Virginia public schools in 2002 after being challenged for "too much profanity.")

Gays/justice: A Study of Ethics, Society, and Law (1988) by Richard D. Mohr (Homosexual agenda.)

Geography Club (2003) by Brent Hartinger (Challenged at the West Bend, Wisconsin Community Memorial Library [2009] as being "obscene or child pornography" from a section
designated "Young Adults." The library board unanimously voted 9–0  to maintain, “without removing, relocating, labeling, or otherwise restricting access,” the books in the young adult
category at the West Bend Community Memorial Library. The vote was a rejection of a four-month campaign conducted by the citizen’s group West Bend Citizens for Safe Libraries to
move fiction and nonfiction books with sexually explicit passages from the young adult section to the adult section and label them as containing sexual material.)

(B) Gerald's Game (1992) by Stephen King.

The Geranium on the Windowsill Just Died, But Teacher Went Right On (1971) by Albert Callum.

(B) The German Republic (1922) by Thomas Mann.

Get Well Soon (2007) by Julie Helpern (Challenged at the Theisen Middle School in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin [2010] by a parent who believes that the book contains inappropriate
subject matter for children.)

Ghosts: A Family Drama in Three Acts (1881) by Henrik Ibsen.

Gilgamesh: A New English Version (2004) by Stephen Mitchell (Challenged in the Clearview Regional High School in Harrison Township, New Jersey [2006] because the
modern translation of one of the oldest known pieces of literature was considered sexually descriptive and unnecessarily explicit. The work itself dates back to about 1700 BCE, some one
thousand years before the writings of Homer.)

Girl Goddess # 9 (1996) by Francesca Lia Block. (**)

Girl, Interrupted (1993) by Susanna Kayson (The New Rochelle, New York Board of Education [2008] announced that it would replace all 50 copies of Susanna Kayson's memoir
after school officials tore pages from the book deemed "inappropriate" due to sexual content and strong language. Removed was a scene where the rebellious Lisa encourages Susanna to
circumvent hospital rules against sexual intercourse by engaging in oral sex instead. The incident was a hot topic across the blogosphere, transcending political ideology. It was featured
on the left-leaning Boing Boing, the most widely read blog in the world, as well as the top conservative site, Hot Air, which is owned by Michelle Malkin of Fox News. The New Yorker
magazine and The Atlantic Monthly also picked up the story as well as dozens of blog sites focusing on literary and free speech issues.)*

Girls and Sex (1970) by Wardell Pomero ("Deals with bestiality, masturbation, and homosexuality, and endorses pre-adolescent and premarital sex." "Sordid, suggestive, permissive
type of approach.")

A Girl's Life Online (2000) by Katherine Tarbox (Challenged in the English 11 Regents class at Baker High School in Baldwinsville, New York [2008] because of the book's graphic
language. The cautionary tale about Internet safety is one of the five books students could select for the contemporary literature class unit on "teenage struggles.")

(B) The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon (1999) by Stephen King.

Girl With a Pearl Earring (1999) by Tracy Chevalier (Banned in Iran [2006]. "The new government intends to take positive steps for reviving neglected values and considering
religious teaching in the cultural field.")

Give a Boy a Gun (2000) by Todd Strasser (Retained at the Bangor, Pennsylvania Area Middle School [2007] despite a student's aunt's concerns about the book's depiction of school
violence.)

The Giver (1993) by Lois Lowry (Temporarily banned from classes by the Bonita Unified School District in La Verne and San Dimas, California in 1994 after four parents
complained that violent and sexual passages were inappropriate for children. Restricted to students with parental permission at the Columbia Falls, Montana school system (1995)
because of the book's treatment of themes of infanticide and euthanasia. Challenged at the Lakota High School in Cincinnati Ohio in 1996. Lewd; twisted; unfit for analysis by students
because it is violent, sexually explicit and portrays infanticide and euthanasia; "The book is negative. I read it. I don't see the academic value in it. Everything presented to the kids
should be positive or historical, not negative;" "The lady writes well, but when it comes to the ideas in that book, they have no place in my kid's head." Banned by some schools in Kansas
and California; restricted at schools in several other US states. The book addresses many controversial themes including euthanasia. Challenged but retained at the Seaman, Kansas
Unified School District 345 elementary school library [2006]. Appalled by descriptions of adolescent pill-popping, suicide, and lethal injections given to babies and the elderly, two
parents demanded that the Mount Diablo School District, headquartered in Concord, California [2007], eliminate the controversial but award-winning book from the school reading lists
and libraries.)*

The Giving Tree (1964) by Shel Silverstein (Removed from a locked reference collection in the Boulder, Colorado public library in 1988. The book was originally locked away
because the librarian considered it sexist.)*

The Glass Castle: A Memoir (2005) by Jeannette Walls (Challenged at the William S. Hart Union High School District in Saugus, Calif. [2009] as required summer reading for the
honors English program. The 2005 memoir chronicles the author’s harsh childhood and family life and includes profanity, criticisms of Christianity, and accounts of sexual abuse and
prostitution. Students have the option of alternative assignments that still meet objectives and teaching goals.)

The Glass Menagerie (1944) by Tennessee Williams.*

The Glass Teat (1970) by Harlan Ellison.

GLBTQ: The Survival Guide for Queer and Questioning Teens (2003) by Kelly Huegel (Homosexual agenda.)

Go Ask Alice (1971) by anonymous ("Drug use." "Personally offensive." "Graphic language, subject matter, immoral tone, and lack of literary quality found in the book." Challenged
as a reading assignment at Hanaham Middle School in Berkeley County, South Carolina [2008] because of blatant, explicit language using street terms for sex, talking of worms eating
body parts, and blasphemy. The anonymously written 1971 book is about a 15-year-old who gets caught up in a life of drugs and sex before dying from an overdose. Its explicit
references to drugs and sex have been controversial since it was first published.)*

The Goats (1987) by Brock Cole (Contains a passage describing the rescue of a naked girl. Contains offensive and inappropriate language for seventh graders.)

God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater (1965) by Kurt Vonnegut (Completely sick and garbage.)

God of Small Things (1997) by Arundhati Roy (Written in 1996, claimed to be portraying inter-religion. Occasional sex scenes involving a Christian woman and a low caste Hindu
servant. Ban overturned in India.)

God's Little Acre (1933) by Erskine Caldwell.

Going After Cacciato (1979) by Tim O'Brien.

The Golden Book of Chemistry Experiments (1960) by Robert Brent (Banned in the 1960s because the chemistry experiments told as "simple" in the introduction of the book
were simple but very dangerous.)

The Golden Compass (USA -- otherwise titled "Northern Lights") (1995) by Phillip Pullman ("Religious viewpoint." Retained by the publicly funded Dufferin-Peel Catholic
School District in Missassauga, Ontario, Canada [2008] with a sticker on the inside cover telling readers "representations of the church in this novel are purely fictional and are not
reflective of the real Roman Catholic Church or the Gospel of Jesus Christ." Removed, but returned to the library shelves at dozens of schools in the publicly funded Halton, Ontario,
Canada, Catholic School District [2007] despite that the books were challenged as being "written by an atheist where the characters and text are anti-God, anti-Catholic, and anti-
religion." The book and two other Pullman titles from his Dark Materials trilogy were pulled from public display for review, but are available for students upon request. The publicly
funded Calgary, Alberta, Canada Catholic School District [2007] returned the book to its literary shelves two months after ordering its removal. Detractors accused the book of having
antireligious content. Similar concerns prompted the Catholic League, a Roman-Catholic anti-defamation organization in the US, to urge parents to boycott a movie version of the book
that was released in December 2007. Challenged by the Conkwright Middle School in Winchester, Kentucky [2007] because the main character drinks wine and ingests poppy with her
meals, and the book presents an anti-Christian doctrine. Pulled from the St. John Newmann Middle School and Lourdes High School in Oshkosh, Wisconsin [2007] because of concerns
about what critics call its "anti-Christian message." Challenged at the Shallowater Middle School in Lubbock, Texas [2007] because of the book's "anti-religious messages." Pulled from
the library shelves at Ortega Middle School in Alamosa, Colorado [2007] for what critics regard as the book's anti-religious views. District officials later returned the book to circulation.)

The Golem's Eye (2004) by Jonathan Stroud (Restored by the Lackawanna New York School Board [2008] along with several other books following accusations of censorship by
some parents and teachers. The book was pulled from the middle school library recommended list because of concerns that the book deals with the occult.)

Gone With the Wind (1936) by Margaret Mitchell (Banned in Anaheim, California for its depiction of the behavior of Scarlett O'Hara and the freed slaves in the novel. "Uses the
word 'nigger.'")*

Good Moon Rising (1996) by Nancy Garden (Gay-positive themes. **)

Goosebumps: Say Cheese and Die! (1992) (and the whole series) by R.L. Stine (Challenged but retained in the Anoka-Hennepin Minnesota school system in 1997 because
"children under the age of 12 may not be able to handle the frightening content of the books" "Too frightening for children and inappropriate for school libraries." "Satanic symbolism,
demonic possession, and violence.")*

Gorillas in the Mist (1983) by Dian Fossey (Teachers at the Westlake Middle School in Erie, Pennsylvania, using felt-tipped pens, blacked out passages pertaining to masturbation
and mating.)

The Gospel According to the New York Times: How the World's Most Powerful News Organization Shapes Your Mind and Values (2002) by William Proctor.

Gossip Girl: A Novel (2002) (series) by Cecily Von Zeigesar (Homosexuality, sexual content, drugs, unsuited to age group, and offensive language.)

Go Tell It On the Mountain (1953) by James Baldwin.

(B) The Grapes of Wrath (1939) by John Steinbeck ("Vulgar words." "Uses the name of God and Jesus in a 'vain and profane manner along with inappropriate sexual references.'"
"The Grapes of Wrath has offended our citizenry by falsely implying that many of our fine people are a low, ignorant, profane, and blasphemous type living in a vicious, filthy manner."
"pornographic, filthy, and dirty.")*

The Graphic Work of M.C. Escher (1984) by M.C. Escher (Pornographic, perverted, and morbid themes.)

Great Expectations (1860) by Charles Dickens.

The Great Gatsby (1925) by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

The Great Gilly Hopkins (1978) by Katherine Paterson ("Profanity, graphic violence, contains the words 'hell' and 'damn.'" "Filled with profanity, blasphemy, and obscenities, and
gutter language.")*

Great Sex Tips (2001) by Anne Hooper (Challenged, but retained in the Marple public library in Broomall, Pennsylvania in 2004 along with several sexual instruction manuals
including:
The Joy of Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein and Edmund White; Sex Toys 101: A Playfully Uninhibited Guide by Rachel Venning; Ultimate Guide to Fellatio
by Violet Blue
; and The Illustrated Guide to Extended Massive Orgasm by Steve Bodansky because the books are "seriously objectionable in text and pictures due to the
sexually explicit material.")

Great Soul: Mahatma Gandhi and His Struggles With India (2011) by Joseph Lelveld (Banned in parts of India [2011]. A Santa Cruz, California educational organization,
Foundation for Excellence, canceled an event planned in honor of the Pulitzer Prize winning author [2011]. The foundation provides scholarships for students in India and canceled the
event after the biography hinted a homosexual relationship between Gandhi and a German named Hermann Kallenbach.)

The Great Tree of Avalon: Child of the Dark Prophecy (2004) by T.A. Barron (Restored by the Lackawanna, New York school board [2008] along with several other books
following accusations of censorship by some parents and teachers. The books were pulled from the middle school library recommended list because of concerns that the book dealt with
the occult.)

(B) The Green Mile (series) (1996) by Stephen King.
.
(B) The Green Pope (1954) by Miguel Angel Asturias.

Grendel (1971) by John Champlin Gardner, Jr. ("Too obscene and violent for high school students." Retained in the Sherwood, Oregon School District sophomore English reading
list [2008] after concerns were expressed about some of the novel's scenes describing torture and mutilation.)

The Grooming of Alice (2000) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor (Banned from the Webb City, Missouri school library in 2002 because the book promotes homosexuality and "discusses
issues best left to parents.")

The Group (1963) by Mary McCarthy (Obscene; indecent.)

Growing Up Chicana/o (1993) by Tiffany Ana Lopez. (**)

Growing Up Female in America (1987) by Eve Merriam.

Guess What? (1988) by Mem Fox, Vivienne Goodman ("Not appropriate reading material for young children because of the inclusion of witches, names of punk rockers, an other
elements which are negative in the illustrations.")*

(B) The Guide for the Perplexed (12th century) by Moses Maimonides (Rabbi Moses ben Maimon).

Guide to Fellatio by Violet Blue (Subject matter offensive.)

Guinness Book of World Records by Antonia Cunningham, Ed. (Retained in the Waukesha, Wisconsin elementary schools in 2002 despite a challenge that the book was sexually
explicit.)

The Gulag Archipelago 1918 -- 1956: An Experiment in Literary Investigation (1973) by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (Banned in the Soviet Union because it went against the
common way of thinking there.)

Gulliver's Travels (Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships)
(1726) by Jonathan Swift
(Wicked and obscene.)

The Guy Book: An Owner's Manual (2002) by Mavis Jukes (Challenged in the Lockwood, Montana Middle school library [2006] by parents who objected to what they believe to be
misleading, sexually explicit material in the book. The book was retained. The challenge came on the heels of a December decision by the board to pull three books from the middle
school library. Those books were
The Vanishing Hitchhiker: American Urban Legends by Jan Brunvand, and Urban Legends and Alligators in the Sewer, both by
Thomas Craughwell
. The same parent brought those titles -- and their content -- to the attention of the librarian and the superintendent.)
The Face on the Milk Carton (1990) by Caroline B. Cooney.

Fade (1988) by Robert Cormier.

(B) Fahrenheit 451 (1953) by Ray Bradbury (Dystopic; this book was 'expurgated' without the author's consent -- 2 versions -- one adult and one juvenile. When Bradbury found
out, he demanded that the expurgated copies be withdrawn completely. In response, the American Library Association Intellectual Freedom Committee, Young Adult division was
formed. They demanded that if a book is expurgated, it must be clearly specified. In a coda to his book, Bradbury added this comment: "I  will not go gently onto a shelf, degutted, to
become a non-book." It was banned in some US schools for being interpreted as critical of state-sponsored censorship. Challenged at the Conroe, Texas Independent School District
[2006] because of the following: "discussion of being drunk, smoking cigarettes, violence, 'dirty talk', references to the Bible, and using God's name in vain." The novel went against the
complainant's 'religious beliefs.')*

Fair and Tender Ladies (1988) by Lee Smith (Challenged in the Washington County, Virginia schools [2007] because of a few "crude" words deemed too graphic for teenage honor
students. The author claimed the book provides teens with a safe forum to address issues such as unwanted pregnancy. The novel demonstrates the necessity of a good education and
highlights the importance of southwestern Virginia's heritage.)*

Fair Game (1993) by Erika Tamar.

Fallen Angels (1988) by Walter Dean Myers (**; "More than 300 vulgarities." "I've read it. It's a filthy book. I think the language portrays what went on in Vietnam very
accurately. But I don't think we should require a 14-year-old to read it." Banned from the George County, Mississippi schools in 2002 because of profanity. Banned at the Franklin
Central High School in Indianapolis, Indiana in 2004 because of concerns about the book's profanity. The book was assigned in English classes for sophomores. Retained in the
Northwest Suburban High School District 214 reading list in Arlington Heights, Illinois [2006], along with eight other challenged titles. A board member, elected amid promises to bring
her Christian beliefs into all board decision-making, raised the controversy based on excerpts from the books she'd found on the Internet. Challenged on the accelerated reading list at
Chinquapin Elementary School in Duplin County, North Carolina [2008] because the book is littered with hundreds of expletives, including racial epithets and slang terms for
homosexuals. Challenged in the Coeur d'Alene, Idaho School District [2007]. Some parents say the book, along with five others, should require parental permission for students to read
them.)

Families (1981) by Meredith Tax (Removed from Fairfax County school board libraries even though board members praised the book.)

Families: A Celebration of Diversity, Commitment, and Love  (1993) by Aylette Jenness.

The Family Book (2003) by Todd Parr.*

Family Limitation (~1912) by Margaret Sanger (The Comstock Law of 1873 (officially known as the Federal Anti-Obscenity Act) forbade distribution of birth control information. In
1915, Margaret Sanger's husband was jailed for distributing his wife's book, which described and advocated various methods of contraception. Sanger herself had fled toe country to
avoid prosecution, but would return in 1916 to start the American Birth Control League, which eventually merged with other groups to form Planned Parenthood.)

Family Secrets (1985) by Norma Klein.

Family Values: Two Moms and Their Son (1993) by Phyllis Burke.

Fanny Hill: Or, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (1748) by John Cleland (Frequently suppressed since its initial publication in 1749. The story of a prostitute is known both for
its frank sexual depictions and its parodies of contemporary literature, such as Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders. The US Supreme Court finally cleared it from obscenity charges in 1966.
"Fanny Hill was a prostitute." "Numerous incidents of heterosexual and lesbian sexual activity, female masturbation, flagellation, and voyeurism." "Lewd and obscene." Cleland was
arrested for "corrupting the King's subjects" with this book.)

(B) A Farewell to Arms (1929) by Ernest Hemingway.

(B) Farmer Giles of Ham (1937) by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Fast Sam, Cool Clyde and Stuff (1975) by Walter Dean Myers.

Father Christmas (1973) by Raymond Briggs.

Fat Kid Rules the World (2003) by K. L. Going (Removed from the Pickens County, SC middle- and high-school library shelves [2007] because "the language, the sexual references,
and drug use are not appropriate for middle school students." In 2004, the book was named a Michael Printz honor book for excellence in young adult literature by the Young Adult
Library Services Association. Challenged as a suggested summer reading at the Alsip, Illinois Prairie Junior High School [2007] because the book is "laced with profanity and other
mature content." The District 126 superintendent plans to retain the award-winning selection as one of the many titles offered to students to read, preferably from the recommended
summer reading list, before school begins.)

The Federal Mafia (1992)by Irwin Schiff (An injunction was issued by a US district court in Nevada under 26 USC  7408 against Irwin Schiff and associates Cynthia Neum and
Lawrence Cohen, against the sale of this book by those persons as the court found that the information it contains is fraudulent.)

(B) The Fellowship of the Ring: being the first part of The Lord of the Rings (1954) by J.R.R. Tolkien.

The Feminine Plural: Stories by Women About Growing Up (1972) by Stephanie Spinner.

Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L. James. (offensive language, sexually explicit)

The Fighting Ground (1984) by Avi (Edward Irving Wortis) (Banned from the Bay District school's library shelves in Panama City, Florida [2008] after a parent noted several
profanities uttered by some soldiers. The award-winning book, intended for the fourth-grade reading level, is about a 24 hour period in the life of a 13-year-old boy during the
Revolutionary War.)

The Figure in the Shadows (1975) by John Bellairs (Restricted at the Dysart Unified School District libraries in El Mirage, Arizona in 1990 because of two uses of profanity and
because of its link to magic)

Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide For the Dying (1992) by Derek Humphry (Banned by law in France.)

Finding Laura Buggs (1999) by Stanley Gordon West (Challenged in the Fargo, North Dakota School District classrooms [2007] because the book includes passages on such topics
as sexual bondage, incest, murder, and infanticide. According to district policy, the complainant does not have standing to request either formal or informal reviews because she doesn't
have a child in classes using the book. The complainant also contacted the Montana Department of Public Instruction and several state legislators.)

(B) Firestarter (1980) by Stephen King.

The First Circle (1968) by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn  (Banned in the Soviet Union for the negative portrayal of Joseph Stalin.)

The First Man of Rome (1990) by Colleen McCullough.

A Fisherman of the Inland Sea (1994) by Ursula K. Le Guin (Removed from the West Brazoria, Texas Junior High School library [2006] because of inappropriate language. Books
on "sensitive topics such as death, suicide, physical or sexual abuse, and teenage dating relationships" were moved to a restricted "young adult" section from which students can borrow
only with written parental permission.)

Five Chinese Brothers (1938) by Claire H. Bishop (Challenged at the Spokane, Washington School District library in 1994 because it is too violent.)

The Fixer (1966) by Bernard Malamud.

The Flamingo Rising (1997) by Larry Baker (Challenged on the Stevenson High School, Lincolnshire, Illinois summer reading list [2010] because a parent complained that "a
sexual encounter depicted in the novel was definitely something you could consider X-rated.")

Flashcards of My Life (2006) by Charise Mericle Harper.

Flotilla II -- the Battle for Citation (1996) by Mike Eldar (The book was banned in 1997 by a government book committee acting under the "Official Secret Act" after it had been
approved by the Israeli military censor and regardless of the fact that about 500 books had been sold. The book was republished in 2002 with no changes.)

Flowers for Algernon (1958) by Daniel Keyes (Banned in Florida, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Arkansas, and challenged in Ohio and Wyoming.)*

Flowers in the Attic (1979) by V.C. Andrews ("Pornography." "Profanity.")*

Follow the River (1981) by James Alexander Thom (Removed from the tenth grade curriculum at the high school in Noblesville, Indiana in 2002 after a parent objected to
passages about an imagined rape; the book remains in the library collection.)

Fools Crow (1986) by James Welch (Challenged at the Helena, Montana High School [2007] because of disturbing descriptions of rape, mutilation, and murder. Supporters of the
book say its literary value -- specifically its insights into American Indian society and Montana history -- outweighs the controversial passages.)

(B) Footsteps (1990) by Pramoedya Ananta Toer.

Forbidden Knowledge: A Landmark Exploration of the Dark Side of Human Ingenuity and Imagination by Roger Shattuck.

Foreign Relations of the United States, 1964 -- 1968, Volume XXVI, Indonesia, Malaysia-Singapore, Philippines by Edward C. Keefer, Ed. (US role in Indonesia's deadly
purge of communists.)

Forever (1975) by Judy Blume (Banned from middle school libraries in the Elgin, Illinois School District U46 in 1997 because of sex scenes. The decision was upheld in June 1999
after an hour of emotional school board discussion. After a four-year absence, the book was returned in 2002 to the shelves in the school district's middle school libraries. "Profane
homosexual agenda." "Contains 4-letter words and talked about masturbation, birth control, and disobedience to parents." "Demoralizes marital sex." "Pornographic and does not
promote the sanctity of family life." "Explores areas God didn't intend to explore outside of marriage.")

Forever Amber (1944) by Kathleen  Winsor ("Obscene, indecent, impure." "Contains 70 references to sexual intercourse, 39 to illegitimate pregnancies; 7 to abortions; 10 descriptions
of women undressing, dressing, or bathing in the presence of men; 5 references to incest; 13 references ridiculing marriage; and 49 miscellaneous objectionable passages.")

Forever in Blue, the Fourth Summer of the Sisterhood (2007) by Ann Brashares (Challenged at the Theisen Middle School in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin [2010] by a parent who
believes that the book has inappropriate subject matter for children. Some [of the characters in the book] are sexually active, and alcohol is part of their recreation. --
ALA)

(B) From a Buick 8 (1983) by Stephen King.

For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940) by Ernest Hemingway (When the Pulitzer Prize Advisory Board recommended For Whom the Bell Tolls for the 1940 prize, Columbia University
President Nicholas Murray Butler said, "I hope that you will reconsider before you ask the University to be associated with an award for a work of this nature." There was no Pulitzer
Prize for fiction for 1940. The US Post Office in the same year declared the book non-mailable; Eleven Turkish book publishers went on trial before an Istanbul martial law tribunal on
charges of publishing, possessing and selling books in violation of an order of the Istanbul martial law command. They faced possible sentences of between one month's and six month's
imprisonment "for spreading propaganda unfavorable to the state" and the confiscation of their books. Banned in Spain during Franco's rule for its pro-Republican views.)

(B) Foundations of Leninism (1924) by Josef Stalin.

(B) Four Past Midnight (1990) by Stephen King.

Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang (1993) by Joyce Carol Oates.

The Fragile Flag: the Hall Family Chronicles (1984) by Jane Langton (Challenged at the Jefferson City, Colorado school library in 1986 because the book portrays the US
government as "shallow" and "manipulative," and "lacking in intelligence and responsibility.")

Frankenstein: or, the Modern Prometheus (1818 -- published anonymously; 1823 with author's name) by Mary Shelley (Banned in South Africa's apartheid regime. In
1955, the New York Times reported that Frankenstein was banned in South Africa as 'indecent, objectionable, or obscene.')*

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything (2005) by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner (Retained in the Northwest Suburban
High School District 214 reading list in Arlington Heights, Illinois [2006], along with eight other challenged titles. A board member, elected amid promises to bring her Christian beliefs
into all board decision-making, raised the controversy based on excerpts from the books she'd found on the Internet.)*

Freaky Friday (1972) by Mary Rodgers (Drinking, smoking, violence, use of 'Oh, God')

Freddy's Book (1973) by John Neufeld.

Freedom and Order: A Commentary on the American Political Scene (1966) by Henry Steele Commager.

Freedom Writers Diary: How a Teacher and 150 Teens Used Writing to Change Themselves and the World Around Them (1999) by the Freedom Writers (Banned in
Perry Township Indiana for sexual content and racial slurs. Challenged in the Howell, Michigan High School [2007] because of the book's strong sexual content. In response to a
request from the president of the Livingston Organization for Values in Education, or LOVE, the county's top law enforcement official reviewed the books to see whether laws against
distribution of sexually explicit materials to minors had been broken. "After reading the books in question, it is clear that the explicit passages illustrated a larger literary, artistic, or
political message and were not included solely to appeal to the prurient interest of minors," the county prosecutor wrote. "Whether these materials are appropriate for minors is a decision
to be made by the school board, but I find that they are not in violation of the criminal laws." The best-selling book has achieved national acclaim and was made into a hit movie.)

Friends Till the End (1982) by Todd Strasser.

From Here To Eternity (1951) by James Jones.

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun (1995) by Jacqueline Woodson.

(B) The Fugitive (Perburuan) (1950) by Pramoedya Ananta Toer (Banned in Indonesia for being too communistic and for other political reasons.)

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic (2006) by Alison Bechdel (Challenged but retained in the Marshall, Missouri public library [2006], despite being deemed 'pornographic' by some
members of the community.)

Funhouse (1980) by Dean Koontz.
Jack (1989) by A.M. Homes.

(B) The Jacket (1915) by Jack London.
.
Jacob Have I Loved (1980) by Katherine Paterson.

Jæger – i krig med eliten (2009) by Thomas Rathsack (Danish military tried to ban this book in September 2009 for National Security reasons, but the court rejected the ban as the
book was already leaked in the press and on the Internet.)

Jake and Honeybunch Go To Heaven (1987) by Margot Zemach, Harve Zemach.

Jake Reinvented (2003) by Gordan Korman (Challenged in the Higley United School District in Gilbert, Arizona [2007] because the novel contains themes of teen drinking, sex,
and violence.)

James and the Giant Peach (1961) by Roald Dahl (Challenged at the Deep Creek Elementary School in Charlotte Harbor, Florida in 1991 because it is "not appropriate reading
material for young children." Challenged at the Pederson Elementary School in Altoona, Wisconsin in 1991 because the book uses the word 'ass' and parts of the book deal with wine,
tobacco, and snuff. Challenged at the Morton Elementary School library in Brooksville, Florida in 1992 because the book contains a foul word and promotes drugs and whiskey.
Challenged at the Stafford County, Virginia Schools in 1995 because the tale contains crude language and encourages children to disobey their parents and other adults. The book was
removed from the classroom and placed in the library, where access was restricted.)

James Baldwin: American Writer (Lives of Notable Gay Men and Lesbians) (1993) by Randall Kenan. (*)

(B) Jerusalem Delivered (1581) by Torquato Tasso (Burned in France in the 16th century for containing ideas subversive to the authority of kings.)

(B) Jimmie Higgins: A Story (1919) by Upton Sinclair.

Jinnah: India-Partition-Independence (2009) by Jaswant Singh (Temporarily banned in Gujarat, India in August 2009. The ban was overturned December 2009.)

Jinnah of Pakistan (1982) by Stanley Wolpert (Banned in Pakistan for recounting Jinnah's taste for wine and pork.)

John Maynard Keynes (Notable Biographies) (1994) by Jeffrey Escoffier, Martin Duberman. (*)

Johnny Got His Gun (1938) by Dalton Trumbo.

Journal of Current Pictorial (1905) by Chinese Alliance (Banned by China's Qing government for spreading anti-Qing propaganda.)

The Joy Luck Club (1989) by Amy Tan (Sexually explicit.)

The Joy of Gay Sex (1977) by Charles Silverstein and Edmund White (Challenged, but retained in the Marple public library in Broomall, Pennsylvania in 2004 along with
several sexual instruction manuals including: Sex Toys 101: a Playfully Uninhibited Guide by Rachel Venning; Great Sex Tips by Anne Hooper; Ultimate Guide to Fellatio by Violet
Blue; and The Illustrated Guide to Extended Massive Orgasm by Steve Bodansky because the books are "seriously objectionable in text and pictures due to the sexually explicit
material." Challenged but retained at the Nampa, Idaho Public Library [2006] along with 7 other books, including the Joy of Sex despite the complaint that "they are very pornographic
in nature and they have very explicit and detailed illustrations and photographs which we feel doesn't belong in a library." The library board approved policy changes that restrict
children's access to any holdings that may fall under the state's harmful to minors statute and barred the library from buying movies rated NC-17 or X. The book was relocated to the
director's office [2008] to be accessed by patrons who specifically request the book and it was eventually restored to the collection. Challenged in the Lewis and Clark library in Helena,
Montana [2008] due to objections over its content. The book has been in the library's collection since 1993. The library director accepted the recommendation of the library's collection
review committee that the book be retained in the collection. Restricted minors' access in the Topeka and Shawnee County, Kansas Public Library [2009] because a group contended
that the material is "harmful to minors under state law.")

The Joy of Sex (1972) by Alex Comfort ("Sexually oriented." Restricted minors' access in the Topeka and Shawnee County, Kansas Public Library [2009] because a group contended
that the material is "harmful to minors under state law." Later, the board voted 6-3 in favor of adopting a staff recommendation to keep the books where they are currently located on
the shelves in the library's Health Information Neighborhood section.)

Jubilee (1966) by Margaret Walker (Challenged at the Jacksonville, Ill. High School [2010] by a pastor who said he found the fictionalized story of the author’s grandmother, who
was born as a slave in Georgia, “offensive” and “trashy” and a novel about the way of life in the Old South. “We believe it is to promote superiority for white people and to step on black
people and make them feel inferior.” The Ku Klux Klan challenged the novel in South Carolina in 1977 because it produces “racial strife and hatred.”)

(B) Jude the Obscure (1895) by Thomas Hardy ("A grimy story." "Steeped in sex." "A shameful nightmare to be forgotten as soon as possible." "Foul in detail.")

Judgment Day (1935) by James T. Farrell.

Julie of the Wolves (1972) by Jean Craighead George (Challenged in Mexico, Missouri in 1982 because of the book's "socialist, communist, evolutionary, and anti-family themes."
Challenged in Littleton, Colorado in 1989 school libraries because "the subject matter was better suited to older students, not sixth-graders." Challenged at the Erie Elementary School in
Chandler, Arizona in 1994 because the book contains a passage that some parents found inappropriate in which a man forcibly kisses his wife. The Newbery award-winning book,
depicting the experiences of an Eskimo girl, was chosen by the teacher of a third, fourth, and fifth grade class for the Antarctic unit she was teaching. Challenged in the classrooms and
school libraries in Palmdale, California (1995) because the book describes a rape. Removed from the sixth-grade curriculum of the New Brighton Area School District in Pulaski
Township, Pennsylvania in 1996 because of a graphic marital rape scene. Challenged at the Hanson Lane Elementary School in Ramona, California in 1996 because it includes an
attempted rape of a 13-year-old girl. "References to family alcoholism, abuse, and divorce." "Includes a rape scene.")*

July's People (1981) by Nadine Gordimer (Banned during the Apartheid era in South Africa. It is now in the South African school curriculum.)

Jump Ship to Freedom (1981) by James and Christopher Collier.

(B) The Jungle (1906) by Upton Sinclair.

Junie B. Jones series by Barbara Park, Denise Brunkus (About Junie B. Jones and Some Sneaky, Peeky Spying: challenged in the Wake County, North Carolina schools
[2006]. Parents are getting help from Called2Action, a Christian group that says its mission is to "promote and defend our shared family and social values.")* (
Junie B. Jones and the
Stupid Smelly Bus
, 1992; Junie B. Jones and a Little Monkey Business, 1993; Junie B. Jones and Her Big Fat Mouth, 1993; Junie B. Jones and Some Sneaky Peeky
Spying
, 1994; Junie B. Jones and the Yucky Blucky Fruitcake, 1995; Junie B. Jones and That Meanie Jim's Birthday, 1996; Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome Warren,
1996;
Junie B. Jones Has a Monster Under Her Bed, 1997; Junie B. Jones Is Not a Crook, 1997; Junie B. Jones is a Party Animal, 1997; Junie B. Jones is a Beauty
Shop Guy
, 1998; Junie B. Jones Smells Something Fishy, 1998; Junie B. Jones is (Almost) a Flower Girl, 1999; Junie B. Jones and the Mushy Gushy Valentine, 1999;
Junie B. Jones Has a Peep in Her Pocket, 2000; Junie B. Jones is Captain Field Day, 2001; Junie B. Jones is a Graduation Girl, 2001; Junie B., First Grader (at last!),
2001;
Junie B., First Grader, Boss of Lunch, 2002; Junie B., First Grader: Toothless Wonder, 2002; Junie B., First Grader: Cheater Pants, 2003; Junie B., First Grader:
One-Man Band
, 2003; Junie B., First Grader: Shipwrecked, 2004; Junie B., First Grader: Boo ... and I MEAN IT!, 2004; Junie B., First Grader: Jingle Bells, Batman
Smells (P.S. So Does May)
, 2005; Junie B., First Grader, Aloha-ha-ha!, 2006; Junie B., First Grader: Dumb Bunny!, 2007; Top-Secret, Personal Beeswax: A Journal by
Junie B. (and Me!)
, 2008; Junie B's Essential Survival Guide to School, 2009).   

Just Friends (1991) by Norma Klein.

Just Listen (2008) by Sarah Dessen (Challenged in the Hillsborough County, Florida school system [2007] because it was considered too intense for teens.)
Kaddish and Other Poems, 1958 -- 1960 by Allen Ginsberg.

Kaffir Boy: The True Story of a Black Youth's coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa (1986) by Mark Mathabane (Banned in a number of schools due to a controversial
scene involving child prostitution and sodomy. As a result, Mathabane has authorized a revised version for use in such schools. Retained at the East Union High School in Manteca,
California [2006] senior English class. The controversial autobiography was challenged as inappropriate because a passage uses the words 'penis' and 'anus' to describe a scene in which
a group of young boys are about to prostitute themselves to a group of men for food. Banned from the Burlingame, California Intermediate School [2007]. The book has been challenged
frequently since its publication in 1986 because of two graphic paragraphs describing men preparing to engage in anal sex with young boys. It earned the 1987 Christopher Award for
literature, "affirming the highest value of the human spirit." It was also a finalist for the Robert F. Kennedy Award for books representing "concern for the poor and the powerless."
Challenged, but retained, at the San Luis Obispo California High School [2010] despite containing a passage that graphically details sexual assault. The book had been taught at the
school for more than a decade without controversy.)

The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana (1883) by Sir Richard Francis Burton and Forster Fitzgerald Arbuthnot, translators ("Bears the dubious distinction of being the filthiest
book published today. In my opinion, the human mind is scarcely able to withstand the impact of the overwhelming obscenity and sexually based desire for torture in the Kama Sutra."
--Deputy Collector of Customs Robert W. Edwards, 1962.)

Kane and Abel (1979) by Jeffrey Archer.

Karen Kepplewhite Is the World's Best Kisser (1983) by Eve Bunting (Challenged at the Little Butte Intermediate School in Eagle Point, Oregon in 1989 because the book was
too mature for the elementary class students.)

Karlsson-on-the-Roof (1955) by Astrid Lindgren (Banned in North America for subversive views on baby sitters.) (Also Karlsson Flies Again, 1962; Karlsson-on-the-Roof is
Sneaking Around Again
, 1968)

k*d* lang (1997) by Paula Martinac (Gay and lesbian themes. *)

Keesha's House (2003) by Helen Frost.

(B) Key of Solomon (14th or 15th century) by unknown (Banned in Europe by the Pope Innocent VI in 1350 and again in 1559 for being dangerous.)

Killing Mr. Griffin (1978) by Lois Duncan.

The Kincora Scandal (1996) by Chris Moore (Banned in the UK for alleging British cover up over Satanic abuse.)

Kindred (1979) by Octavia B. Butler.

King and King (2002) by Linda de Haan and Stern Nijland (Restricted to adults in a school's library in Wilmington, North Carolina (2004) because the children's book is about a
prince whose true love turns out to be another prince; gay-positive themes. Parents of a Lexington, Massachusetts [2006] second grader protested that their son's teacher read the fairy
tale about gay marriage to the class without warning parents first. The book was used as part of a lesson about different types of weddings. "By presenting this kind of issue at such a
young age, they're trying to indoctrinate our children," stated the parent. The incident renewed the efforts of Waltham-based Parents' Rights Coalition to rid the state's schools of books
and lessons that advance the "homosexual agenda" in public schools. US District Court Judge Mark Wolf ruled February 23, 2007, that public schools are "entitled to teach anything
that is reasonably related to the goals of preparing students to become engaged and productive citizens in our democracy." Wolf said the courts had decided in other cases that parents'
rights to exercise their religious beliefs were not violated when their children were exposed to contrary ideas in school. The parents appealed to the US Court of Appeals for the First
Circuit, which dismissed the case on January 31, 2008. The courts said, "There is no evidence of systemic indoctrination. There is no allegation that the student was asked to affirm gay
marriage. Requiring a student to read a particular gook is generally no coercive of free exercise rights. Public schools are not obligated to shield individual students from ideas which
potentially are religiously offensive, particularly when the school imposes no requirement that the student agree with or affirm those ideas, or even participate in discussions about
them." The parents plan to appeal to the US Supreme Court claiming the curriculum violated their right to religious freedom. Withdrawn from two Bristol, England, UK primary schools
[2008] following objections from parents who claimed the book was unsuitable for children and that they had not been consulted on their opinions. Retained at the Lower Macungie,
Pennsylvania LIbrary [2007]. The donated book was challenged because "let them be kids ... and not worry about homosexuality, race, religion. Just let them live freely as kids.")

The Kingdom of God Is Within You (1894) by Leo Tolstoy (Christian anarchist content.)

(B) King Lear (1603 or 1606 or 1608 or 1623??) by William Shakespeare (In 1999, a teacher at the Windsor Forest High School in Savannah, Georgia required seniors to obtain
permission slips before they could read this play. The School Board had pulled the play from school reading lists, citing "adult language" and references to sex and violence. Many
students and parents protested the decision, which also included the outright banning of three other of Shakespeare's plays. Banned from the English stage from 1788 to 1820, out of
respect to King George III's alleged insanity)*

The King Must Die (1958) by Mary Renault.

The King Never Smiles (2006) by Paul M. Handley (Criticism of King Bhumibol Adulyadej.)

King Stark by Howard Pyle.

Kissing Tennessee and Other Stories From the Stardust Dance (2000) by Kathi Appelt.

The Kite Runner (2003) by Khaled Hosseini (Challenged as appropriate study in 10-grade honors English class at Freedom High School in Morganton, North Carolina [2008]
because the novel depicts a sodomy rape in graphic detail and uses vulgar language. Retained in the Jackson County School District, Marianna, Florida [2008] after being removed
from the required reading list for one class. The school board voted to retain the book in the library by a vote of five to two. Removed from a reading list at Centennial High School in
Champaign, Illinois [2008] due to objections from a parent whose child was assigned the book for summer reading. Challenged in Burke County schools in Morgantown, North Carolina
[2008] by parents concerned about the violence and sexual situations portrayed.)*

Knocked Out By My Nunga-Nungas (2002) by Louise Rennison (Challenged at the Oregon, Wisconsin Middle School in 2002 by a parent was particularly offended by a passage
where a boy touches a girl's breast.)*

Know About AIDS (1986) by Margaret O. Hyde and Elizabeth Forsyth.

Krik? Krak! (1996) by Edwidge Dandicat (Sexually explicit.)

Kurt Cobain (2004) by Michael Martin (Removed from all elementary and middle Farmington, Minn. school libraries [2009] because the book was “very dark and violent and made
references to the use of Ritalin as being a precursor to the use of illicit drugs. It also covered topics such as mental illness and suicide.”)
Go to the SECOND part of the banned books pages on this
website!!!

To go to a page about authors whose books have been
burned, go
HERE!!
(B) Cacau (1933) by Jorge Amado.

(B) Call of the Wild (1903) by Jack  London (Censored in several European dictatorships in the 1920s and 1930s. In 1929, Italy banned all cheap editions and Yugoslavia banned
all of Jack London's books as being "too radical." Burned in Nazi bonfires.)*

Candide, ou l'optimisme (1759) by Voltaire (Francois-Marie Arouet)  (In 1930, US Customs seized Harvard-bound copies of Candide, Voltaire's critically hailed satire, claiming
obscenity. Two Harvard professors defended the work, and it was later admitted in a different edition. In 1944, the US Post office demanded the omission of
Candide from a mailed
Concord Books catalog. "Obscene." "Godless and sacrilegious." "Too vulgar and erotic.")

Candy (1958), by Terry Southern and Mason Hoffenberg; published under the pseudonym Maxwell Kenton (When the book was first published in France it was immediately
banned there and subsequently reappeared under a different title (
Lollipop). It was published in the United States in 1964. Due to outrage over the book's frank sexuality and a
copyright loop, stores carrying Candy were closed down and their copies of the book hauled away. In 2006, Playboy Magazine listed Candy among the 25 sexiest novels ever written.
The saga of this book is recounted in a book by Southern's son,
The Candy Men: The Rollicking Life and Times of the Notorious Novel, Candy by Nile Southern.)

Can Such Things Be? (1893) by Ambrose Bierce (In 1918, the US War Department told the American Library Association to remove a number of pacifist and disturbing books,
including this book, from camp libraries, a directive which was taken to also apply to the homefront. Censorship in libraries run by the federal government continued afterwards as well.)

The Canterbury Tales (~end of 14th century) by Geoffrey Chaucer (Banned for decades from the US mail under the Comstock Law of 1873. Officially known as the Federal Anti-
Obscenity Act, this law banned the mailing of lewd, filthy, obscene, or indecent materials. The Comstock laws, while now unenforced, remain for the most part on the books today.
"Sexual explicitness." "Vulgar language." "Promotion of women's lib.")*

(B) Caprichos (1926) by Alfred Kerr.

Captain Underpants and the Invasion of the Incredibly Naughty Cafeteria Ladies From Outer Space (and the Subsequent Assault of the Equally Evil Lunchroom
Zombie Nerds)
(1999) by Dav Pilkey (About the series: "The content IS sometimes vulgar, scatological, rude -- but so are 9-year-old boys." "I didn't care for the language. I didn't care
for the innuendo." "Irreverence to authority.")*

Captain Underpants and the Perilous Plot of Professor Poopypants (2000) by Dav Pilkey.*

Captain Underpants and the Attack of the Talking Toilets (1999) by Dav Pilkey.*

(B) Carrie (1974) by Stephen King.

The Cartoons That Shook the World (2009) by Jytte Klausen (Yale University Press in New Haven, Connecticut [2009] removed twelve cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad from
an upcoming book about how they caused outrage across the Muslim world, citing fears of violence. A Danish newspaper originally published the cartoons — including one depicting
Muhammad wearing a bomb-shaped turban — in 2005. Other Western publications reprinted them. The following year, the cartoons triggered massive protests from Morocco to
Indonesia. Rioters torched Danish and other Western diplomatic missions. Some Muslim countries boycotted Danish products. Islamic law generally opposes any depiction of the prophet,
even favorable, for fear it could lead to idolatry.)

Casanova's Homecoming (1918) by Arthur Schnitzler.

Cassell Dictionary of Slang (1998) by Jonathon Green, Ed. (Banned in the Wake County, NC schools [2006] under pressure from one of a growing number of conservative
Christian groups using the Internet to encourage school book bans.)

Catch 22 (1961) by Joseph Heller ("Completely sick and garbage.")

Catcher in the Rye (1951) by J.D. Salinger (Teachers need to explain why this book is to be read "A filthy, filthy book." "Preferred nine times out of ten by wackos, killers, and
disgruntled teenagers." "Excess vulgar language, sexual scenes, things concerning moral issues, excessive violence, and anything dealing with the occult." "Centered around negative
activity." "Profanity, reference to suicide, vulgarity, disrespect, and anti-Christian sentiments." "The main character exhibits behavior that is inappropriate." Challenged in the Big Sky
High School in Missoula, Montana in 2009. Challenged, but retained, in the Martin County, Florida School District [2010] despite a parent's concern about inappropriate language.)*

Cat's Cradle (1963) by Kurt Vonnegut ("Completely sick and garbage.")

The Cay (1969) by Theodore Taylor ("Maligns African Americans." "Racist.")

(B) Cell (2006) by Stephen King.

The Celluloid Closet: Homosexuality in the Movies (1987) by Vito Russo ("Encourages and condones homosexuality.")

Censorship (1990) by Robert Emmet Long, Ed.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (1964) by Roald Dahl ("Espouses a poor philosophy of life.")*

Cheaters (1999) by Eric Jerome Dickey ("Profane language, sexuality, homosexual agenda.")

{B) Child of All Nations (1980) by Pramoedya Ananta Toer.

A Child of the Dark Prophecy (2004) by T.A. Baron (Restored by the Lackawanna New York School Board [2008] along with several other books following accusations of
censorship by some parents and teachers. The books were pulled from the middle school library recommended list because of concerns that the books dealt with the occult.)

Child of God (1973) by Cormac McCarthy (Removed as an appropriate pre-Advanced English placement reading at the Jim Ned High School in Tuscola, Texas [2007].)

Children of the Alley (1959) by Naguib Mahfouz ("Blasphemous." "Offensive to the prophets of Islam." "Misrepresents the character of Muhammad.")

Chinese Handcuffs (1989) by Chris Crutcher (Retained in the Delphi, Indiana Community High School's curriculum [2009] depite claims of inappropriate sexual content and
graphic language.)

The Chocolate War (1974) by Robert Cormier (**; "Profanity, masturbation, fantasy" "Sexual content, offensive language, and violence." "Sexually explicit." Challenged but
retained  in the West Hartford, Connecticut schools [2006]. Parents of a King Philip Middle School eighth-grader thought the language, sexual content, and violence make the book PG-
13. Challenged in the Wake County, NC schools [2006] because the book has "vulgar and sexually explicit language." Parents are getting help from Called2Action, a Christian group
that says its mission is to "promote and defend our shared family and social values." Removed from the Harford County, Maryland High School curriculum [2007] because of its message
on the dangers of bullying is overshadowed by instances vulgar language, including homophobic slurs. In November 2007, the Harford County's school superintendent reversed her
decision to bar Cormier's novel and returned it to the classroom. Teachers now have the option of using the novel in a course that deals with harassment and decision making, but must
get permission from all parents of students in the class. Challenged as an optional reading in a bullying unit at the Lake Oswego, Oregon junior high school [2007] because the novel is
"peppered with profanities, ranging from derogatory slang terms to sexual encounters and violence." Students are given a list of book summaries and a letter to take to their parents.
Four of the 8 optional books are labeled as having "mature content/language." Challenged in the Coeur d'Alene, Idaho School District [2007]. Some parents say the book, along with five
others, should require parental permission for students to read them. Challenged as required reading for seventh-grade students at the John H. Kinzie Elementary School in Chicago,
Illinois [2007]. Challenged at the Northridge School District in Johnstown Ohio [2007] because "if these books were a movie, they would be rated R, why should we be encouraging them
to read these books?")

Choke (2001) by Chuck Palahniuk (Homosexual agenda.)

(Book AND Author burned) Christianity Restored (1553) by Michael Servetus (Servetus was arrested for 'heresies and horrible, execrable blasphemies against the Holy Trinity,
against the Son of God, against the baptism of infants and foundations of the Christian religion" and was sentenced to be burned to ashes with his books for trying to 'infect the world
with stinking heretical poison.' He was subsequently burned at the stake on October 27, 1553.)

(B) Christine (1983) by Stephen King.

Chronicle of a Death Foretold (1981) by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

The Chronicles of Narnia (1949 -- 1954) by C.S. Lewis.

The Chronicles of Prydain (series) (1964 -- 1968) by Lloyd Alexander.

Church: Charism and Power: Liberation Theology and the Institutional Church (1986) by Leonardo Boff.

The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence (1974) by Victor Marchetti and John D. Marks (Raised the question of whether a citizen can sign away his Fifth Amendment rights or
not.)

Cinderella or the Little Glass Slipper.*

Citizen Tom Paine (1943) by Howard Fast.

Civil Disobedience (1849) by Henry David Thoreau (In the 1950s, according to Walter Harding, Senator Joseph McCarthy had overseas libraries run by the US Information
Service pull an anthology of American Literature from the shelves because it included Civil Disobedience. Banned in South Africa)

The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty, Beauty's Punishment, Beauty's Release (early 1980s) by A.N. Roquelaure (Anne Rice) (trilogy) (In 1996, removed from the Columbus
Metropolitan Library after a patron determined that the books were "pornographic". Removed from the Lake Lanier Regional Library system in Gwinnett County, Georgia, in 1992.)

(B) Clandestine in Chile: The Adventures of Miguel Littin (1986) by Gabriel Garca Marquez.

The Clan of the Cave Bear (1984) by Jean M. Auel (Hardcore graphic sexual content.)

A Clockwork Orange (1962) by Anthony Burgess (Objectionable language.)

(B) Colorado Kid (2005) by Stephen King.

The Color of Earth (series) by Kim Dong Hwa (Nudity; sex education; sexually explicit; unsuited to age group)

The Color Purple (1982) by Alice Walker (**; "Sexual and social explicitness." "Troubling ideas about race relations, man's relationship to God, African history, and human
sexuality." "Smut" "Homosexuality." "Sexually explicit." "Offensive language." Challenged in the Burke County Schools in Morgantown, North Carolina [2008] by parents concerned
about the homosexuality, rape, and incest portrayed in the book.)

Comentarios Reales de los Incas (1609) by Inca Garcilaso de la Vega (Published in Spain by the son of a Spanish conquistador and an Incan princess, its publication in Lima
was forbidden by Carlos III of Spain during the uprising led by Tupac Amaru II, and was only published again in the Americas in 1918.)

Coming Out in College: The Struggle for a Queer Identity (1994) by Robert A. Rhoads (Homosexual agenda.)

(B) The Communist Manifesto (1848) by Karl Marx (Political reasons. Banned in anti-Communist countries and the US during the Red Scare.)

(B) The Companionate Marriage (1927) by Benjamin Barr Lindsey.

Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm (Excessive violence, negative portrayals of female characters, and anti-Semitic references.)*

(B) The Complete Pig (2000) by Sara Rath.

(B) The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway by Ernest Hemingway.

(B) The Complete Works of William Shakespeare by William Shakespeare.*

Concerning Heretics, Whether They Are to Be Persecuted and How They Are to Be Treated (De haereticis) by Sebastian Castellio (Written in response to the Servetus
burning. Called an evil influence and a blasphemer by Calvin.)

Coney Island of the Mind (1958) by Lawrence Ferlinghetti.

(B) Confessions (1782) by Jean Jacques Rousseau (Banned by US Customs in 1929 as injurious to public morality. His philosophical works were also banned in the USSR in 1935,
and some were placed on the Catholic Church's Index of Prohibited Books in the 18th century. The Index was primarily a matter of church law, but in some areas before the mid-19th
century, it also had the force of secular law. The Index was finally abolished in 1966.)

Confessions of an Only Child (1974) by Norma Klein, Richard Cuffari (Profanity.)

Confessions of Augsburg (1530) by Martin Luther (Published in Germany, outlawed by the Vatican, though specifically the Council of Trent, 1545--1563.)

The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967) by William Styron.

The Contender (1967) by Robert Lipsyte ("Sounds like pretty explicit stuff.")

(B) The Cop Killer: How Mumia-Abu Jamal Conned Millions Into Believing He Was Framed (2000) by Dan Flynn.

(B) Copy Me (an anthology).

The Count of Monte Cristo (1844) by Alexandre Dumas.

The Country Girls (1960) bu Edna O'Brien (Banned by Ireland's censorship board in 1960 for its explicit sexual content.)

The Country Ahead of Us, the Country Behind (1989) by David Guterson.

The Crack Cocaine Diet: A Short Story from Hardly Knew Her (2005) by Laura Lippman (Pulled from a Litchfield, N.H. Campbell High School elective course classroom [2009]
after parents voiced their concerns about a short-stories unit called “Love/Gender/Family Unit” that dealt with subject matters including abortion, cannibalism, homosexuality, and drug
use. The parents said the stories promoted bad behavior and a “political agenda” and they shouldn’t be incorporated into classroom teachings. The Campbell High School English
curriculum said the short story was not intended to glorify bad behavior, rather, it was chosen for its tone and point of view and to show the often devastating consequences of drug use.
The English curriculum adviser eventually resigned.)

Cradle and All: A Novel (2000) by James Patterson (Removed from the Westhampton Beach, New York high school's ninth-grade reading list in 2007 because of "inappropriate
sexual content." The reading list contains more than 300 books from which the ninth-graders must choose to read for course credit.)

Crank (2004) by Ellen Hopkins.

Crazy (1998) by Benjamin Lebert (Removed from the Canyon Vista Middle School in Round Rock, Texas in 2003 by the principal who decided a parent was correct in being
concerned about the book's availability. The parent called the book "vulgar, it talked about parts of the body." There was free use of the "F-word and several C-words." The book was
taken off the shelf at the district's other junior high school library.)

Crazy Lady (1993) by Jane Leslie Conly.

Cross Your Fingers, Spit in Your Hat: Superstitions and Other Beliefs (1974) by Alvin Schwartz, Glen Rounds.

The Crucible (1952) by Arthur Miller ("Contains sick words from the mouths of demon-possessed people. It should be wiped out of the schools or the school board should use them to
fuel the fires of hell." Junk.)

Cuba (2003) by Sharon Gordon (Removed from all Miami Dade County school libraries [2006] because a parent's complaint that the book does not depict an accurate life in Cuba.
The American Civil Liberties Union [ACLU] of Florida filed a lawsuit challenging the decision to remove this book and the 23 other titles in the same series from the district school
libraries. In granting a preliminary injunction in July 2006 against the removal, Judge Alan S. Gold of US District Court in Miami characterized the matter as a "First Amendment
issue" and ruled in favor of the ACLU of Florida, which argued that the books were generally factual and that the board should add to its collection, rather than removing books it
disagreed with. Removed from the Norma Butler Bossard Elementary School library in Miami, Florida [2007] by a parent complaining that the book does not depict an accurate life in
Cuba.)

Cuban Kids (2000) by George Ancona (Banned in the Miami Dade County Public Schools [2006]. The picture book shows a child with a rifle and children saluting the Cuban flag
with the caption, "We will be like Che!")

(B) Cujo (1981) by Stephen King ("Age inappropriate." "Unacceptable language." "Violent; profane and sexually objectionable." "A bunch of garbage." "Rough language." "Explicit sex
scenes." "Pornographic.")

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime (2003) by Mark Haddon (*; Removed from the Lake Fenton, Michigan summer reading program [2020] after parents
complained about its "foul language.")

Curses, Hexes, and Spells (1974) by Daniel Cohen.

Curved River (1963) by Živorad Stojković (In 1963, in Yugoslavia, the book was withdrawn by the publisher [Nolit] at the request of SDB officials. -- wikipedia)